Calgary Geotechnical Society

Events


Welcome to the 2018–2019 lecture series!

The regular lecture series is held at the Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre at 3112 11th Street NE, Calgary. (See map here).
There is parking available either at the ACC or on-street.
The talks are held either in the upstairs hall or downstairs – doors on the west side of the building.
Lectures are free to attend unless stated otherwise.



Date Monday June 3, 2019
EventJune – Spring 2019 Cross Canada Lecture Tour (CCLT)
LocationEdgemont Community Centre, 33 Edgevalley Circle NW, Calgary (Panorama Room)
Time 6:30 – 7:00 pm: Registration and Snacks
7:00 – 8:00 pm: Lecture
Speakers Charles D. Shackelford, Ph.D., P.E., F.ASCE.
  Charles D. Shackelford is Professor and Head of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. He has 35 years of experience pertaining to the geoenvironmental engineering aspects of waste management and environmental remediation, is a licensed professional (civil) engineer (P.E.) in California and Colorado, and has served as an expert on waste disposal issues on numerous occasions for private companies and federal and international agencies (e.g., International Atomic Energy Agency). Dr. Shackelford's research is focused primarily on evaluating flow (seepage) and transport of liquids and contaminants through engineered soil and geosynthetic containment barriers used for liquid and solid waste containment. His research contributions pertaining to the role of diffusion in containment barrier design were recognized in 1995 with the receipt of the Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Prize from the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), and he was recognized in 2013 for his career contributions to the field of environmental geotechnics with the receipt of the inaugural R. Kerry Rowe Honorary Lecture from the International Society for Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering (ISSMGE). He has served as an editor for both the ASCE Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering and the Journal of Hazardous Materials published by Elsevier, Amsterdam, and currently serves as an editorial board member of Elsevier's Geotextiles and Geomembranes and as an associate editor of the Canadian Geotechnical Journal. He also was past chair of the Geoenvironmental Engineering Committee (GEC) of ASCE's Geo-Institute, and past co-chair for the Environmental Geotechnics Committee TC215 of the ISSMGE, and currently serves as a member of both the GEC and TC215. His M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in civil (geotechnical) engineering are from the University of Texas at Austin in 1983 and 1988, respectively.
Topic Enhanced Bentonites for Sustainable Chemical Containment
Abstract Bentonites are naturally occurring, high swelling clays that are mined, processed, and used for a variety of practical applications...
  (e.g., drilling mud, groundwater well seal) and as an ingredient in industrial and commercial products. The ability of bentonites to swell when exposed to water and form a tight porous medium with low hydraulic conductivity also makes bentonites attractive for use as engineered, low-permeability hydraulic and chemical containment barriers, such as geosynthetic clay liners, compacted sand-bentonite liners, soil-bentonite vertical cutoff walls, and bentonite buffers for high level radioactive waste disposal. However, exposure of natural (traditional) bentonites to chemical solutions results in reduced swell that can lead to substantial (orders of magnitude) increases in the permeability of bentonites. For this reason, enhanced bentonites comprising traditional bentonites that are treated chemically to improve the resistance to adverse chemical interactions are being considered for use in engineered chemical containment barriers. This presentation will provide background on the fundamental behavior of traditional bentonites, discuss the issue of the compatibility of traditional bentonites permeated with chemical solutions, introduce the concept of chemical sustainability in terms of hydraulic conductivity, and describe the use of enhanced bentonites for engineered chemical containment barriers. The properties of four commonly evaluated enhanced bentonites, viz., bentonite polymer composite, dense prehydrated GCL, hyper clay, and multiswellable bentonite, as well as proprietary contaminant resistant clays, will be presented and compared with those for traditional bentonites, and potential issues related to long-term stability will be discussed.
Cost $20 per person, free for full-time students.
RSVP Pre-register at Eventbrite
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

Date Thursday May 16, 2019
EventAGM - Calgary and National Reports, CyGS Awards and Lecture
LocationAustrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 - 11 Street NE, Calgary (Main Hall)
Time 5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Registration
6:00 – 6:30 pm: Buffet Dinner
6:30 – 7:00 pm: Awards and CyGS Presentation
7:00 – 8:00 pm: Presentation by Pete Barlow
Speakers Pete Barlow, M.Sc., P.Eng., BGC Engineering Inc.
  Pete Barlow is a graduate from the geotechnical program at the University of Alberta, where he obtained an MSc. in 1986. He has been working as a consulting engineer since then on a wide range of geotechnical projects, mainly in the mining, pipeline and transportation industries. The application of geotechnical engineering to the pipeline industry has been a particular area of focus in the past several years, including trenchless crossings, slope stability and geohazards. He is currently a Principal Engineer with BGC Engineering, working out of their Edmonton office, on projects in Canada, the US and South America.
Topic Reactivation of an Ancient Landslide: Pipeline Rupture and Mitigation
Abstract Land disturbance associated with the progressive expansion of a major pipeline and power corridor, and extensive timber harvesting triggered the reactivation of ground movement of a massive, ancient deep-seated landslide...
  that threatened six major transmission pipelines, including a loss of containment in one of the pipelines. The disturbances were relatively subtle in comparison to the size and depth of the slide, which highlights the extreme sensitivity of the slope. Given the very shallow 4.5 degree slope inclination and the lack of any surface expression of distress over most of the slope area, this case history underscores the importance of considering regionally specific geological conditions with pipeline geohazard evaluations. Extensive measures were implemented to stabilize and manage the landslide included a series of targeted surface and ground water control measures that minimized environmental impact and produced an approximate 100-fold reduction in movement rates.
Sponsors Mobile Augers and Research Ltd.
BGC Engineering Inc.
The involvement and contribution of the organizers and sponsors is gratefully acknowledged.
Cost $50 for regular memebers; $20 for full-time students.
Limited tickets will be available at the door for cash or cheque only.
Pre-registration is required for regular members and students.
RSVP Pre-register at Eventbrite
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

Date Thursday April 18, 2019
EventApril – Regular Series Lecture
LocationAustrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 - 11 Street NE, Calgary
Time 5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snacks
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation
Speakers Dr. Alastair McClymont
  Alastair McClymont is a professional geophysicist with Advisian (a division of WorleyParsons Canada Services Ltd). He has over 15 years of experience in the application of diverse near-surface geophysical techniques to geotechnical site characterization, groundwater exploration, contaminated site remediation, seismic hazard assessments, archeological investigations and other projects. Prior to joining Advisian, Alastair completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Geoscience at the University of Calgary, where his research focused on geophysical applications in groundwater and permafrost projects. He has a B.Sc.(Hons.) in Geology from Victoria University of Wellington (1998), an M.Sc. in Geophysics from the University of British Columbia (2004) in Vancouver, and a Ph.D. in Geophysics from ETH Zurich (the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology; 2008). Alastair has extensive experience in western Canada and has worked on a number of international projects. His recent archaeological work at Holocaust sites in Lithuania was the subject of the PBS NOVA science television documentary Holocaust Escape Tunnel (2017) and the feature film The Good Nazi (2018).
Topic Applications of Geophysical Methods to Support Geotechnical Investigations
Abstract Geophysical methods have been a part of the geotechnical engineering toolbox for decades and, although adoption of the technology...
  over this time has been slow, their use on infrastructure projects has now become routine. New developments in instrumentation and methodology have enabled geophysical data to be acquired over increasingly larger areas, at greater density, and in more dimensions (including time). With these advancements it has become possible to obtain non-invasive, spatially continuous measurements of the subsurface, which can be used to interpolate between and extrapolate from boreholes, geological exposures and excavations. In this presentation I will summarize just a few examples of the application of various geophysical methods to geotechnical engineering projects. The presentation will feature a broad array of engineering geophysical methods and applications using examples, and will demonstrate the advantages and limitations of the technology. The examples will include geophysical assessments for foundation design, mapping overburden and soil thicknesses for site grading and volumetric calculations of expected construction fill and spoil, characterizing geology beneath waterways for optimizing pipeline crossings, and mapping legacy infrastructure on brownfield sites.
Cost $20 per person, free for full-time students.
RSVP Pre-register at Eventbrite
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

Date Thursday March 21, 2019
EventMarch – Regular Series Lecture
LocationAustrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 - 11 Street NE, Calgary
Time 5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snacks
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation
Speakers Lucy Philip, M.Sc., P.Eng.
  Lucy Philip is a Principal and Senior Geotechnical Engineer at Stantec in Calgary. Lucy works on projects all over Western Canada and globally and over the past year has worked on projects in North America, South America and Australia. Originally from the UK, she has an M.Sc. in Engineering Geology and has been in Canada for 11 years; she uses this geological background to better understand and characterize ground conditions and often applies this to rock engineering projects. Over the past year she has presented to the Nevada RoundTable on geotechnical risk and uncertainty in mining geotechnics and has guest lectured to structural geology students at the U of C. Lucy enjoys developing and growing junior staff. Outside of work, Lucy likes to ski and enjoys the outdoors. She is a regular volunteer on the ski hill and this year is a technical official for the alpine events at the Canada Winter Games.
Topic What do we know? What don't we know? Dealing with risk and uncertainty in open pit stability design
Abstract This talk reviews common sources of risk and uncertainty in open pit stability and presents ideas for reducing and dealing with...
  the uncertainty. Risks may present opportunities for pit optimization and this is also explored
Four themes are presented, with ideas for dealing with risk and uncertainty proposed under each theme:
Operational execution and flexibility. This theme presents the need for a Slope Stability Execution Plan including a performance approach and a Plan-Check- Act cycle. Inspections and potential mitigation form part of this theme.
Analysis. This theme reviews risk communication as a strategy for informed decision making, factor of safety approaches, discusses probabilistic analyses, discusses risk and opportunity registers and the importance of integrating interaction with other earth structures, which can be overlooked due to the structures being part of a different work package.
Back to Basics. This theme reviews optimization of investigations and techniques of obtaining and presenting useful information.
Open Your Eyes. This theme reviews evidence-based design, identifies different approaches adopted by other geotechnical projects and industries and reviews how these may be applied to open pit stability, and the importance of third-party reviews.
Although focused on open pits, this talk is also relevant to other mining structures such as waste dumps and dams as well as other geotechnical and rock engineering projects outside the mining industry.
Cost $20 per person, free for full-time students.
RSVP Pre-register at Eventbrite
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

Date Thursday February 21, 2019
EventFebruary – Regular Series Lecture
LocationAustrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 - 11 Street NE, Calgary
Time 5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snacks
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation
Speakers Eli Cuelho P.E.
  Eli Cuelho, P.E., Senior Engineer at TRI and currently serves as the Director of TRI's Transportation Testing and Research Division. He holds a Master's degree from Montana State University in geotechnical engineering (1998). Eli has over twenty years of experience in geosynthetic application research as well as other transportation research areas such as pavement design and analysis, remote sensing and instrumentation, bridge deck performance, and specification development. He is well-published and active on numerous federal, state and industry research projects. Eli is working closely with TRI-Southeast's large-scale testing laboratories to assist clients with full-scale geosynthetic system performance testing. He was a Research Engineer at the WTI from 1998 to 2017 and served as the Program Manager for the Infrastructure Maintenance and Materials program area. Eli is the chair of an ASTM task group dedicated to developing new test procedures for geosynthetics used as pavement and subgrade reinforcement. He is also a member of two TRB committees: the Dynamics and Field Testing of Bridges committee and the Geosynthetics committee. modulus.
Topic Geosynthetics in Transportation - Subgrade Stabilization Research
Abstract Road managers routinely use geogrids and geotextiles for subgrade stabilization applications. ...
  Typical subgrade stabilization applications are temporary haul roads or unpaved low-volume roads, but can also include paved roads built on poorer foundation materials. Full-scale test sections were constructed, trafficked and monitored to compare the relative operational performance of geosynthetics used as subgrade stabilization as well as determine which material properties are most related to performance. Seventeen 15-meter long test sections were constructed - fourteen containing geosynthetic reinforcement and three without. A subgrade material was prepared and constructed to an average CBR strength of approximately 1.8% and an average base course thickness of about 28 cm, with the exception of several controls where subgrade strength and base thickness were intentionally varied to evaluate the effect of these properties on performance. Even though the geotextile materials used during this study showed good performance as subgrade stabilization, material properties associated with their performance was difficult to establish due to the limited number of test sections and lack of relevant tests to properly characterize these types of materials for this application. Using longitudinal rut as the primary indicator of performance, it was determined that the strength and stiffness of the geogrid junctions and tensile strength properties in the cross-machine direction correlated well with performance. Using this knowledge, the design equation associated with the Giroud-Han method was calibrated to make geogrid junction stiffness in the cross-machine direction the primary property of the geosynthetic, thereby replacing geogrid aperture stability modulus.
Cost Free (Generously sponsored by TenCate Geosynthetics)
RSVP Pre-register at Eventbrite
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

Date Thursday January 24, 2019
EventJanuary – Regular Series Lecture
LocationAustrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 - 11 Street NE, Calgary
Time 5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snacks
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation
Speakers Dale Leckie, Ph.D., P.Geol.
  Dale Leckie, P.Geol., has a Ph.D. in Geology, and a M.Sc. and B.Sc. in Geography. He was a scientist at the Geological Survey of Canada and chief geologist at a large Canadian oil company. Dale is currently adjunct professor in Geoscience at University of Calgary. Dale has been president of the Society for Sedimentary Geology (SEPM) and Canadian Society of Petroleum Geologists (CSPG). Dale is recognized for his long-term contributions to geology and is an honorary member of SEPM and CSPG. Dale has published widely on the geology of Western Canada and edited numerous books. He is author of the book "Rocks, Ridges, and Rivers: Geological Wonders of Banff, Yoho, and Jasper National Parks".
Topic Mountain building to rivers - Understanding the Paskapoo/Porcupine Hills Formation as background for geotechnical investigations in the Calgary Urban area
Abstract Dale Leckie will present an overview of the geological evolution of Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin, with emphasis on the Paskapoo/Porcupine Hills Formation in the Calgary urban area. ...
  The Paleocene Paskapoo Formation was deposited during the last phase of foreland basin sedimentation associated with ancestral Rocky Mountains in Western Canada. Lithological heterogeneity associated with meandering river depositional environments best describes the Paskapoo sediments. Following deposition of the Paskapoo Formation, Calgary has been subjected to ~60 million years of uplift, erosion and overburden removal. The final significant geological event to affect Calgary was glaciation and subsequent deglaciation in the last 29,000 years. Analogous modern day fluvial systems, particularly meandering rivers, as they relate to the depositional environment of the Paskapoo Formation will be described.
Cost $20 per person, free for full-time students.
RSVP Pre-register at Eventbrite
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

Date Thursday November 15, 2018
EventNovember – Regular Series Lecture
LocationAustrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 - 11 Street NE, Calgary (Main Hall)
Time 5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snacks
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation
Speakers Bruce Jamieson, Ph.D., P.Eng., University of Calgary
  Bruce has over 35 years of experience spanning snow avalanche hazard management, hazard assessment, snow and avalanche research, avalanche forecasting and avalanche control. He was president of the Canadian Avalanche Association (CAA) from 1992 to 1995, chaired the 1996 International Snow Science Workshop in Banff, Alberta and the CAA's Technical Committee until 2004. During the summer of 2002 and fall of 2008 he was a guest researcher at the Swiss Federal Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research. Bruce was the Principal Investigator of the Applied Snow and Avalanche Research group at the University of Calgary (ASARC), where he supervised 24 graduate students investigating avalanche runout estimation, hazard mapping, avalanche forecasting, snowpack tests, etc. He is a Professional Engineer registered in British Columbia and Alberta, and a professional member of the CAA. Bruce has written over 70 papers in ISI journals, plus over 100 conference papers
Topic Assessing, Mapping and Mitigating Snow Avalanche Risk
Abstract In mid 2018, the Canadian Avalanche Association published a technical manual, entitled Planning Methods for Assessing...
  and Mitigating Snow Avalanche Risk. Each of the fourteen chapters has two or three authors. Bruce Jamieson is the first author of each chapter.
Bruce will identify some aspects of snow avalanches that are different from other slope hazards such as debris flows:
1) explosives are effective triggers; 2) more occurrences; 3) impact forces are lower; 4) the failures initiate in a bonded material within a few degrees of its melting point; 5) the deposits disappear within months.
The effects of each of these factors on assessment or mitigation methods will be summarized. Selected methods for characterizing snow avalanche terrain and expected snow avalanches will be outlined. Short examples of qualitative, semi-quantitative and quantitative assessment and mapping methods will be presented for transportation corridors, occupied structures, transmission lines, and forests. Examples of mitigation methods including structural defences and remote avalanche control systems will be presented.
Cost $20 per person, free for full-time students.
RSVP Pre-register at Eventbrite
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

Date Thursday October 11, 2018
EventOctober – Fall 2018 Cross Canada Lecture Tour (CCLT)
LocationAustrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 - 11 Street NE, Calgary (Alpine Room)
Time 5:30 – 6:00 pm: Registration and Cash Bar
6:00 – 6:30 pm: Buffet Dinner
6:30 – 8:00 pm: Presentation
Speakers Alex Sy, Ph.D., P.Eng., Klohn Crippen Berger Ltd.
  Alex Sy is Vice President, Technical at Klohn Crippen Berger Ltd. in Vancouver, BC. He has more than 40 years of experience in geotechnical and earthquake engineering for transportation, water and wastewater infrastructures, heavy industrial facilities, hydroelectric and water retention dams, and mine tailings dams. He has worked throughout Canada and internationally. Alex has provided forensic engineering and expert witness services for infrastructure failures involving dams, dykes, bridges, pipelines, buildings and landslides. He currently serves on Independent Technical Review Boards for several major water supply projects and tailings storage facilities in high seismic environments.
Alex has a Bachelor in Civil Engineering from the University of Queensland in Australia, and a Master and Ph.D. in Geotechnical Engineering from the University of British Columbia. He is also an Adjunct Professor in the Civil Engineering Department of the University of British Columbia. He has authored more than 50 technical papers in various aspects of geotechnical and geoseismic engineering. Alex received the Canadian Geotechnical Colloquium award from the Canadian Geotechnical Society in 1996, and the VGS Award from the Vancouver Geotechnical Society in 2015. He is a Fellow of the Engineering Institute of Canada.Khokan completed Bachelor of Civil Engineering with distinction from Concordia University in 2012 and worked for three years as junior geotechnical engineer before enrolling in the M.Sc. program in university of Calgary.
Topic Lessons Learned from Geotechnical Failures
Abstract Despite advances in geotechnical engineering, failures do occasionally occur because of unknowns, uncertainties, inexperience,...
  miscommunications, etc. However, failures do provide valuable lessons for the profession that can be learned to minimize future failures. This lecture will present three examples of geotechnical failures in British Columbia, in which the author was engaged to carry out forensic engineering. Pertinent details of the geotechnical failures and their causes are described for the following three case histories: (1) the dyke breach at the Stanley Street Pump Station located on the North Arm of the Fraser River in New Westminster; (2) the excessive foundation settlement at the Queensborough Middle School using stone column foundations in very soft soils at the east end of Lulu Island, and (3) the damaging ground movements at the Panorama/Ridgeview Subdivision located on an old landslide or "earthflow" in Chilliwack. Subsequent remedial solutions and lessons learned are also discussed.
Cost $20 per person, free for full-time students.
RSVP Pre-register at Eventbrite
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

Date Thursday September 13, 2018
EventNovember – Regular Series Lecture
LocationAustrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 - 11 Street NE, Calgary (Alpine Room)
Time 5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and light snack
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation
Speakers Khokan Debnath
  Khokan Debnath is currently an M.Sc. candidate in the Department of Civil Engineering and a Research Assistant in Gas Hydrate Geomechanics Group at University of Calgary. During his M.Sc. study, he specialized in numerical modeling on gas hydrate-bearing sediments. Khokan modeled thermal evolution in the gas hydrate bearing Arctic sediment to establish dissociated zones for select rates of seafloor temperature increase and evaluated the seafloor slope instabilities. Khokan completed Bachelor of Civil Engineering with distinction from Concordia university in 2012 and worked for three years as junior geotechnical engineer before enrolling in the M.Sc. program in university of Calgary.
Topic Modeling Changes in Hydrate Stabilities Associated with Artic Warming ans its Impact on Slope Stabilities
Abstract Large volumes of methane hydrate exist within marine sediments across the Arctic region,...
  such as sediments on the continental margin of the Beaufort Sea. The low temperatures and high pressures required for hydrate stability, and the cold water in this region leads to hydrate being formed at comparatively shallower depths relative to other oceanic sediments. Because of global warming, it is estimated that the ocean bottom temperature of the Arctic region has increased by as much as 1?C since 1979. If this trend in increasing ocean bottom temperature were to continue, hydrate dissociation within the sediment may occur potentially causing slope instabilities. In this paper, changes in the seabed geothermal conditions were modeled to estimate the reduction in the hydrate stability zones within the sediment on the continental margin. The change in sediment strength due to gas hydrate dissociation has been incorporated as input variables in to a slope stability model to determine changes in factor of safety associated with hydrate dissociation and assess the potential for slope instabilities.
Cost $20 per person, free for full-time students.
RSVP Pre-register at Eventbrite
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.