Calgary Geotechnical Society

Events


Welcome to the 2017–2018 lecture series!

The regular lecture series is held at the Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre at 3112 11th Street NE, Calgary. (See map here).
There is parking available either at the ACC or on-street.
The talks are held either in the upstairs hall or downstairs – doors on the west side of the building.
Lectures are free to attend unless stated otherwise.



Date Thursday June 7, 2018
EventJune – Calgary Geotechnical Society Annual Meeting, Award Ceremony and Lecture
LocationAustrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 - 11 Street NE, Calgary (Main Hall)
Time 5:30 – 6:00 pm: Registration and Cash Bar
6:00 – 6:30 pm: Buffet Dinner and Wine
6:30 – 7:00 pm: Calgary and National Reports, CyGS Awards
7:00 – 8:00 pm: Lecture
Speakers Mickey Davachi , Ph.D., Principal Geotechnical Engineer, Wood Plc.
  Mickey Davachi has a BSc and an MSc in Civil Engineering and a DIC, an MSc and a PhD in Civil/Geotechnical Engineering. He is a Principal Geotechnical Engineer with Wood. He has over 48 years of broad and diverse experience in providing technical specialist review and advise, due diligence, expert witness, Engineer of Record, project management, study, planning, geotechnical investigation, design, construction supervision, dam safety review and safety inspection for a wide variety of Canadian and International industry sectors including mining, oil sands, multi-disciplinary hydroelectric, water power, water resources, wind power, ports, marine, industrial and transportation projects.
Topic Diavik Diamond Mine in the Northwest Territories, Canada
Abstract The Diavik Diamond Mine is an unincorporated joint venture between Diavik Diamond Mines Inc. (60%) and Aber Diamond...
  Mines Ltd. (40%) Diavik Diamond Mines Inc. is a wholly owned subsidiary of Rio Tinto Plc of London, England. The Diavik Diamond Mine is located on a 20 square kilometre island known as East Island, in Lac de Gras, approximately 300 kilometres northeast of Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. Four diamond ore bodies, kimberlite pipes, are located beneath the waters of Lac de Gras just offshore of East Island. These four pipes, called A154 North, A154 South, A418 and A21 are being mined by open pit mining methods. In addition, two of the richer pipes, A154 South and A418, will support underground mining once open pit mining is completed. These four pipes contain reserves of 26 million tonnes of kimberlite. An average annual production rate of six million carats is expected. The ore will be mined over a 20-year mine life. To allow open-pit mining, Diavik constructed three water diversion structures (dikes) to allow the overlying water to be removed temporarily for mining. In 2002, Diavik completed the first dike that encircles the A154 North and A154 South pipes and removed the water behind the dike for open pit mining. Diamond production was started in early 2003. A154 dike was constructed using the crushed granite supplied from a quarry located on East Island. A418 dike was constructed from mined granitic rock from A154 open pit excavation. A plastic concrete cut off wall and the jet grouting was used for seepage control through the dike and overburden and weathered bedrock foundation. A grout curtain was constructed in the bedrock below the cut off wall.
This presentation will describe the site conditions, design data, design and construction of the dikes, the plastic concrete cut off wall, the grout curtain, the open pit and the underground.
Sponsors Mobile Augers and Research Ltd.
Cost $50 per person; pre-registration by Eventbrite required.
$20 for full-time students; a $20 sponsorship by Clifton Associates to this event is available by request at announce@cgygeosociety.org for the first five students.
RSVP Eventbrite CyGS Annual General Meeting and Dr. Mickey Davachi Lecture
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

Date Wednesday May 23, 2018
EventMay – Spring 2018 Cross Canada Lecture Tour (CCLT)
LocationAustrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 - 11 Street NE, Calgary (Alpine Room)
Time 5:30 – 6:00 pm: Registration and Cash Bar
6:00 – 6:30 pm: Buffet Dinner and Wine
6:30 – 7:30 pm: Lecture
Speakers T.D. O'Rourke, Ph.D., Professor, Cornell University
  Tom O'Rourke is the Thomas R. Briggs Professor of Engineering in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cornell University. He is a member of the US National Academy of Engineering, a Distinguished Member of ASCE, an International Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering, a Member of the Mexican Academy of Engineering, and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has received a number of distinctions for his research and teaching, including the Stephen D. Bechtel Pipeline Engineering and Ralph B.Peck Awards from ASCE. He gave the 2009 Rankine Lecture and 2016 Terzaghi Lecture.
Dr. O'Rourke served as President of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute (EERI) and as the chair or member of many professional society committees. He received the George W. Housner Medal in 2016 for contributions to earthquake engineering and has authored or co-authored over 380 technical publications. His research interests cover geotechnical engineering, earthquake engineering, underground construction technologies, engineering for large, geographically distributed systems, and geographic information technologies and database management. He has served on numerous government advisory boards, as well as the consulting boards or peer reviews for many projects associated with highway, rapid transit, water supply, and energy distribution systems, and has acted as an adviser on more than 120 projects in 13 different countries.
Topic Ground Deformation Effects on Subsurface Pipelines and Infrastructure Systems
Abstract There are tens of millions of km of pipelines worldwide used in water supplies, gas and liquid fuel delivery systems, electric...
  power networks, and wastewater conveyance facilities. An overview of these critical infrastructure assets is provided. Soil-structure interaction affecting pipeline and underground conduit response to externally imposed ground deformation are examined, starting with stress transfer from soil to the circular surface of the pipe. Various models for soil-pipeline interaction are described, and a methodology is proposed for evaluating soil-pipeline interaction in granular soils for any direction of pipe movement at any depth. Suction-enhanced soil reaction to relative soil-pipe movement is discussed. Guidance is provided regarding soil-pipeline interaction modeling in which the pipeline is represented as a beam vs a three-dimensional shell. Large-scale laboratory testing and numerical modeling for the next generation hazard-resilient pipelines are described, and innovative ways of accommodating ground deformation are illustrated. Water supply system response to widespread liquefaction-induced ground deformation during the Canterbury Earthquake Sequence in New Zealand is evaluated with high-density LiDAR and GIS analyses, and a methodology is presented for estimating pipeline damage as the combined response to liquefaction-induced differential settlement and lateral ground strain. The community impact of pipeline system performance is illustrated with respect to the role that the water supply plays in fire suppression in San Francisco.
Cost $45 per person; payment by cash or cheque at the door only; pre-registration by Eventbrite required.
Free for full-time students; pre-registration at announce@cgygeosociety.org
RSVP Eventbrite CCLT Dr. O'Rourke
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

Date Tuesday April 17, 2018
EventApril – Regular Series Lecture
LocationAustrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 - 11 Street NE, Calgary (Main Hall)
Time 5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snacks
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation
Speakers Georgina Griffin, M.Eng. P.Eng., Clifton Associates Ltd.
  Georgina Griffin, the 2017 recipient of the Calgary Geotechnical Society Award, has worked in the geotechnical consulting industry in Calgary for over 30 years. After graduating from the University of Alberta in 1984 with a B.Sc. in Civil Engineering only to discover that the job market was one of the worst in decades, she stayed on at the U of A to complete an M.Eng. in Civil Engineering with a specialization in Geotechnical Engineering. Since 1986, Georgina has worked for several consulting firms in Calgary including EBA Engineering, Thurber Engineering, UMA, Jacques Whitford, Stantec, AMEC, and currently Clifton Associates Ltd. Although most of her experience has covered most of Alberta, Georgina also had the opportunity early in her career to work in both the western and eastern Arctic. In 2017, Georgina was presented with the Calgary Geotechnical Society Award for her contribution to the geotechnical engineering community in Calgary.
Topic Swelling and Shrinking Clays in Alberta
Abstract Swelling and shrinking clays in Alberta do exist. These soils have impacted foundations across the province and often ...
  geotechnical engineers unfamiliar with their occurrence have either not recognized them or have not emphasized their impact to their clients. In southern Alberta, communities such as Drumheller, Cochrane, and Black Diamond have well known examples of structures that have been severely damaged due to swelling clays, but not many people know that there is at least one example in Calgary as well as a recent example in Drayton Valley. In the Edmonton area, there are clays that exhibit shrinkage rather than swelling. In this presentation, there will be discussions on the mechanisms involved in swelling and shrinkage; how to identify potential problem soils; project examples; tips on how to minimize or mitigate damages; and how to make your clients more aware of the issues.
Cost $20 per person; free for full-time students.
Payment is by cash or check at the door only.
RSVPNot Required

Date Tuesday March 20, 2018
EventMarch – Regular Series Lecture
LocationAustrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 - 11 Street NE, Calgary (Main Hall)
Time 5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snacks
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation
Speakers Sam Proskin, Ph.D., P.Eng., Thurber Engineering Ltd.
  Dr. Proskin is a senior geotechnical engineer with 21 years of consulting experience for mining, oil and gas, and public sectors in western Canada, NWT, Nunavut and Yukon Territory. Since joining Thurber in May 2015 senior geotechnical engineering support for earthfill structures and permafrost and provides leadership to the tailings geotechnical group in Calgary. His experience includes geotechnical engineering of permafrost, project management for northern construction projects, ice engineering of ice roads and ice pads geotechnical engineering of oil sands fine tailings. While at EBA Engineering, Dr. Proskin developed their ice cover and winter road engineering practice with the geophysical practice in ice profiling. The practice provided comprehensive design and monitoring services associated with temporary ice structures to support moving and stationary loads for energy and mining clients in Alberta, NWT, Nunavut and Manitoba. Dr. Proskin was a subject matter expert in the development of Alberta Workplace Best Practice for Building and Working Safely on Ice and Transportation Association of Canada's Guidelines for Building and Operating Winter Roads. The NAPEGG's Professional Award of Merit recognized his contribution to the Tibbitt to Contwoyto Winter Road in 2008. In 2011 his contributions to the Colomac Winter Road Project were honoured with INAC's NWT Region Circle of Excellence Award. Dr. Proskin is a co-founder of NOR-EX Ice Engineering Inc., a consulting firm providing technical and management support to clients building and using ice covers across Canada. During his tenure as VP Engineering he was responsible for providing business management and technical leadership in ice and geotechnical engineering.
Topic Ice Roads and Mine Resupply - Lessons from the Tibbitt to Contwoyto Winter Road, NWT
Abstract The Tibbitt to Contwoyto Winter road is a 300 km long temporary road across frozen lakes, boreal forest and tundra terrain...
  in the Northwest Territories. It allows three major mining operations (Diavik, Ekati and Gahcho Kue) to bring in materials, equipment and fuel. About 80% of the road is built over lake ice covers and so requires special construction, engineering and QA to safely manage the transport of up to 10,000 loads and 340,000 tonnes in a given year.
This talk will highlight some of the lessons Sam learned from 2002 to 2012 when he worked on the project. It will also offer some advice for planning drilling or construction operations on lake or river ice and sea ice.
Cost $20 per person; free for full-time students.
Payment is by cash or check at the door only.
RSVPNot Required

Date Thursday February 15, 2018
EventFebruary – Regular Series Lecture
LocationAustrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 - 11 Street NE, Calgary (Main Hall)
Time 5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snacks
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation
Speakers Vanessa Werden, LL.D., SHK Law Corporation
  Vanessa is a senior associate at SHK Law Corporation and her practice focuses on construction law and insurance defence, including defence of professional negligence claims and regulatory complaints on behalf of civil, structural and geotechnical engineers and architects. In her construction law practice, Vanessa advises developers, contractors, construction managers and trade contractors, on builders liens, contract disputes, cost overruns and delay claims. Vanessa's experience includes a stadium construction litigation matter, and the arbitration of delay, extra work and deficiency claims following the construction of hydropower facilities on Vancouver Island and in northern British Columbia. Vanessa is a member of the Law Societies of British Columbia and Alberta.
Topic Consultants' Liability for Field Review
Abstract Consultants can be liable for errors that are not their own. If a contractor makes a mistake which costs the owner money,...
  in many cases the owner will sue both the contractor and the consultant. The owner will say that he was relying on the consultant to make sure that the contractor does his job correctly. Even third parties, such as subsequent owners, who have never met and had no contractual relationship with the consultant, will often allege they were relying on the consultant to protect them from contractor mistakes because of Letters of Assurance. Learn what you can be liable for and what you can do to minimize your risk. We hope this talk will provide some guidance for consultants who have to navigate this tricky area..
Cost $20 per person; free for full-time students.
Payment is by cash or check at the door only.
RSVPNot Required

Date Tuesday January 23, 2018
EventJanuary – Regular Series Lecture
LocationAustrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 - 11 Street NE, Calgary (Main Hall)
Time 5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snacks
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation
Speakers Ertan Ozmen, M.Sc., P.E., P.Eng., Clifton Associates Ltd.
  Ertan Ozmen is the Practice Lead of Geotechnical and Materials Engineering groups of Clifton Associates. Ertan has a Master of Science degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Nevada, Reno. He is a registered professional civil engineer in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Nevada and California and has more than 20 years of progressive experience in managing geotechnical and construction materials testing projects. His background encompasses a wide range of geotechnical and geophysical skills.
Topic Fundamentals of Project Management and Financial Basics for Geotechnical Professionals
Abstract The presentation will cover the key financial terms such as "Accounts Receivable, Work-in-Progress, Fee Types - Cost Plus, Cost...
  Plus Fixed Fee, Cost Plus Maximum, Lump Sum/Fixed Fee, Revenue, Utilization, Variance, Write off, Overhead and Profit Contribution.
Cost $20 per person; free for full-time students.
Payment is by cash or check at the door only.
RSVPNot Required

Date Wednesday December 13, 2017– POSTPONED
EventDecember – Regular Series Lecture
LocationAustrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 - 11 Street NE, Calgary (Main Hall)
Time 5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snacks
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation
Speakers Ertan Ozmen, M.Sc., P.E., P.Eng., Clifton Associates Ltd.
  Ertan Ozmen is the Practice Lead of Geotechnical and Materials Engineering groups of Clifton Associates. Ertan has a Master of Science degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Nevada, Reno. He is a registered professional civil engineer in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Nevada and California and has more than 20 years of progressive experience in managing geotechnical and construction materials testing projects. His background encompasses a wide range of geotechnical and geophysical skills.
Topic Fundamentals of Project Management and Financial Basics for Geotechnical Professionals
Abstract The presentation will cover the key financial terms such as "Accounts Receivable, Work-in-Progress, Fee Types - Cost Plus, Cost...
  Plus Fixed Fee, Cost Plus Maximum, Lump Sum/Fixed Fee, Revenue, Utilization, Variance, Write off, Overhead and Profit Contribution.
Cost $20 per person; free for full-time students.
Payment is by cash or check at the door only.
RSVPNot Required

Date Tuesday November 21, 2017
EventNovember – Regular Series Lecture
LocationAustrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 - 11 Street NE, Calgary (Main Hall)
Time 5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snacks
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation
Speakers Shuai (Marshal) Man, M.Sc., University of Calgary
  Marshal recently obtained his MSc degree in geotechnical engineering from the University of Calgary, under the supervision of Dr. Ron Wong. His MSc thesis discussed several interesting topics in hydraulic fracturing from a geotechnical perspective. The topics include the compression and creep behavior of granular materials, as well as particle-laden two-phase fluid flow. He is currently conducting research at the University of Calgary, with a focus on soil-pipeline interaction.
Topic Crushing and Embedment of Proppants during High Stressed Rock-Proppant Interaction Test
Abstract Proppant and sand play an important role in hydraulic fracturing. They keep hydraulically-induced fractures open by withstanding...
  the in-situ compressive pressures. Under certain circumstances, inadequate material strength could cause proppant and sand particles to experience grain crushing. In this study, time-independent and -dependent compression behavior of proppant and sand grains are investigated experimentally and numerically. Furthermore, to mimic the mechanical behavior of proppant and sand under reservoir conditions in oil fields, rock-proppant interaction tests have been performed. In general, ceramic proppants showed superior mechanical performance to natural sand. Additionally, flow behavior of proppant and sand particles are investigated. Pressure gradients of particle-laden slurries flowing through a small-diameter pipe were experimentally investigated and subsequently simulated by numerical modeling. A generalized Darcy-Weisbach equation was proposed for the prediction of pressure gradients.
CostFree
RSVPNot Required

Date Tuesday October 24, 2017
EventOctober – Fall 2017 Cross Canada Lecture Tour (CCLT)
LocationAustrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 - 11 Street NE, Calgary (Alpine Room)
Time 5:30 – 6:00 pm: Registration and Cash Bar
6:00 – 6:30 pm: Buffet Dinner
6:30 – 8:00 pm: Presentation
Speakers Jean-Marie Konrad, ing, Ph.D., Professor, Université Laval
  Dr. Konrad is a registered civil engineer with a Master's degree from Université Laval and a Doctorate degree from the University of Alberta where he contributed to the development of frost heave mechanics. He worked in the private sector as a geotechnical engineer for SNC-Lavalin and James-Bay Hydro Electric Corporation, at the National Research Council with respect to the geotechnical aspects of the artificial drilling islands in the Beaufort Sea, development of interpretation techniques of in situ testing data in weak soils and academia at the University of Waterloo (Ontario) and Université Laval. From 1998 to 2008, he was the Chairholder of an NSERC industrial research chair on frost action in civil engineering structures. Presently he is professor of civil engineering at Université Laval and the Chairholder of an NSERC industrial research chair on the optimisation of the life-cycle of earth dams. Dr. Konrad is the author or co-author of over 150 technical papers. For the last twenty-five years, he has also been a consultant for various projects related to artificial freezing, permafrost engineering, dam construction and safety assessment.
Topic Advances in Dam Design
Abstract Embankment dam performance and lifespan are closely related to the hydric, thermal and mechanical behaviour of materials...
  used during its construction. The apparent simplicity of embankment dams hides complex and often poorly known behaviours resulting from thermo-hydro-mechanical coupling phenomena. Understanding the different behaviours as well as their interrelationships is of paramount importance to optimize the life cycle of these structures. Hydro-Québec Production obtained the necessary approvals to build a 1,550-MW hydroelectric complex on the Rivière Romaine, north of the municipality of Havre-Saint-Pierre on the north shore of the St. Lawrence. The complex will consist of four hydropower generating stations with average annual output of 8.0 TWh. Construction of the Romaine-2 development began in 2009. Romaine-2 was commissioned in 2014 and the Romaine-1 development was commissioned in 2015. Work on the Romaine-3 and Romaine-4 developments, which will be operational in 2017 and 2020, respectively is underway. Since 2009, the NSERC/HQ industrial research chair in Life Cycle Optimization for Embankment Dams contributed to the advancement of various aspects in dam design. Major developments for seepage induced erosion are presented. The use of centrifuge testing for predicting deformation of Romaine 2 are discussed. Rockfill properties are viewed from a fractal perspective.
Cost $50 per person, payment is by cash or cheque at the door only; pre-registration is required.
RSVP By email to announce@cgygeosociety.org or phone Remco Kleinlugtenbelt at 403-852-3702 by October 19, 2017.
Please include your company name, phone number and indicate any dietary restrictions.

Date Wednesday September 20, 2017
EventSeptember – Regular Series Lecture
LocationAustrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 - 11 Street NE, Calgary (Main Hall)
Time 12:00 – 12:30 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snacks
12:30 – 1:30 pm: Presentation
Speakers Jasmin Raymond, Ph.D., Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS)
  Interested in geothermal energy, Professor Jasmin Raymond is conducting research work on low to medium temperature resources, including heat pump systems. The main objective of his projects, done in collaboration with geothermal designers, operators and manufacturers, is to improve the efficiency and profitability of systems by providing scientific and technological innovations. Field testing and numerical modeling are the main activities he carries out.
Mr Raymond is a hydrogeologist and he teaches geothermal energy basics at Institut national de la recherche scientifique in Quebec City. He obtained his Ph.D. at Laval University and a B.Sc. at McGill University. During his young career, he received numerous prices such as a Banting Scholarship for his postdoctoral research. He currently holds a research chair from l'Institut nordique du Québec to investigate the geothermal potential of northern communities and mines in addition to be the coleader of an international research group on geothermal energy supported by UNESCO. Highly involved in the scientific community, he participates to a task group of the Canadian Standard Association on geothermal heat pumps and the geothermal advisory committee of Geoscience BC. He coauthored a report from the Geological Survey of Canada on the geothermal potential of the country and was awarded the Canadian Geotechnical Society Colloquium in order to complete a Canadian lecture tour during 2016-2017.
http://www.inrs.ca/english/jasmin-raymond
http://www.inrs.ca/english/research-centres/ete/northern-geothermal-potential-research-chair
Topic Assessment of the Subsurface Thermal Conductivity for Geothermal Applications
Abstract The construction of green buildings using geothermal energy requires geo-scientists and engineers to evaluate the thermal...
  state and properties of the ground. In situ assessment of the subsurface temperature and thermal conductivity is commonly performed to design the heating and cooling system of commercial buildings with ground-coupled heat pumps. Those two parameters have a high impact on the operating temperature of ground heat exchangers (GHEs), consequently affecting the length of boreholes needed to fulfill the energy needs and the savings provided by the system. The demand for such services has increased rapidly since the geothermal heat pump market in Canada grew by more than 35% from 2006 to 2009. A review of field methods used to measure the subsurface thermal conductivity in the scope of geothermal system design will be presented.
The most commonly used method for direct assessments is the thermal response test (TRT) fully developed in the 90's with mobile apparatus. The TRT consists of circulating heated water in a pilot GHE installed in a borehole, where temperature and flow rate are monitored. The transient temperature response is analyzed to evaluate the subsurface thermal conductivity. Heat injection can also be achieved with a heating cable inserted into the GHE to conduct a TRT without flowing water, the latter being affected by surface temperature variations. An apparatus with heating cable sections has recently been developed to keep a low power requirement, hence facilitating the test. Indirect methods are now emerging as alternatives to TRTs. Interpretation of geophysical well logs are a viable option to infer the subsurface thermal conductivity. The inverse modeling of a temperature profile measured in an exploration well can further help to assess the subsurface thermal conductivity, when knowing the terrestrial heat flow. In Canada, the terrestrial heat flow has been determined over 40% of the territory, restricting the interpretation of temperature profiles to specific regions. Laboratory measurements performed on samples collected in surface outcrops or drilled cores can finally be achieved. For example, thermal conductivity data have been synthesized through a thermostratigraphic assessment of the St. Lawrence Lowlands to evaluate the geothermal potential of this sedimentary basin. Geostatistical simulations were then carried out to map the spatial distribution of the subsurface thermal conductivity at the urban district scale to the north of Montreal. Such projects will be presented to highlight geothermal research trends relevant to geotechnicians involved in the building industry.
CostFree
RSVPNot Required