2020-2021

Welcome to the 2020–2021 lecture series!

In efforts to maintain social distancing as well as opportunity to engage more participants, the CyGS presentations will be held virtually using the Zoom video conferencing application.
Lectures are free to attend unless stated otherwise.

Current Event

Regular Event Lecture Series

The executive committee of the Calgary Geotechnical Society (CyGS) is pleased to hold this years AGM virtually, to be followed by a presentation by Dr. Chris Bunce, P. Eng. titled “Geotechnical Challenges faced by Railways”. In efforts to maintain social distancing as well as opportunity to engage more participants, the presentation will be held virtually using the Zoom video conferencing application. Please see below for more details.

DATE:
Jun 16, 2021 03:30 PM Mountain Time (US and Canada)

Register in Advance for this meeting:
https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZ0rdO6spzosHdP5tySo5w6e3jLJlmrTslx3

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

SPEAKER:
Dr. Chris Bunce, P. Eng

Dr. Chris Bunce, P.Eng. is a professional geotechnical/geological engineer and manager with 30+ years experience specializing in natural hazard assessment and mitigation, emergency response and all aspects of constructing transportation infrastructure. He has managed and supervised teams of engineers, environmental scientists, technologists, hazardous materials specialists, geotechnical experts, consultants, contractors, and mining personnel; completing multi-million-dollar design, environmental remediation, construction earthworks, mining and railway projects across North America. He completed both his Ph.D. and M.Sc. in landslide prediction and risk assessment. He has a passion for natural hazard management, and developing and implementing superior geotechnical engineering solutions. He is a strong leader with a desire to improve the geotechnical engineering field through education and research. Dr. Bunce has been involved in projects including landslide stabilization natural hazard management, rail spur, siding and sub-grade construction and repair, site investigation rock slope design, stabilization and installation and testing of rock reinforcement, rock fall protection, debris flow assessment and protection, pipeline routing, directional drill crossings mining pit wall and rock waste-dump assessments and slope stability, groundwater dewatering, geotechnical mapping dam construction, foundation grouting, and emergency response to natural and environmental incidents. Some of the major clients and projects he has worked on include the Canadian Pacific (CP) and Canadian National (CN) and other railways across North America, Teck Resources in their northeast and southeast BC coal mines, the Oldman River Dam in Southwest Alberta, numerous pipeline projects in BC and AB, the investigation and remediation of underground coal mining and slope stabilization investigations and mitigation projects.

TOPIC:
“Geotechnical Challenges faced by Railways”

Dr. Bunce will discuss some of the geotechnical challenges faced by railways and the approaches most often taken to respond to and manage these risks by revisiting some of the incidents and projects he has been involved in for the last 25 years.

Past Events

DATE:
May 25, 2021 04:00 PM Mountain Time (US and Canada)

SPEAKER:
Dr. Kshama Roy

TOPIC:
Pipe-soil Interaction research from an integrated industry and academia perspective.

About 74 times every year (About 16 in North America), pipeline failure occurs due to geohazards around the world, and therefore, understanding the mechanism of pipe-soil interaction is of utmost importance. However, due to the complex nature of pipe-soil interaction as it requires an understanding of both structural/mechanical and geotechnical engineering, there are several areas in both pipeline design and integrity assessment where further research is needed from the geotechnical perspective. This talk has been designed to address some of these potential research areas inspired by the current industry practice.

DATE:
Apr 21, 2021 04:00 PM Mountain Time (US and Canada)

SPEAKER:
Mr. Martin Lun, M.Sc., P.Eng. and Mr. Charles Kwok, M.Sc., P.Eng.

TOPIC:
194th Ave Overpass Project

To accommodate the continuing growth in the West Macleod area in South Calgary, a new roadway consisting of an approximately 10 m high embankment, known as 194th Avenue S.E. Priddis Slough Crossing, was constructed over an environmentally sensitive low-lying area within a large body of water. The subsurface conditions consist of soft and organic pond deposits over a highly variable sand and gravel layer, over clay deposits ranging from 10 m to 20 m in thickness, underlain by sedimentary bedrock. Area-wide preloading was required to construct the roadway which included constructing a single-span wildlife underpass bridge founded on steel piles. The effects imposed by the on-going settlement was a consideration in the design of the bridge crossing and associated retaining structures. Further, in order to meet the target schedule for road opening, construction of the roadway required installation of area-wide wick drains and preloading technique to accelerate consolidation settlement.

This presentation describes the geotechnical programs completed prior to and during construction, compares the estimated and measured embankment settlements, and discusses constructability issues during installation of gravel shear keys and wick drains through the surficial sand and gravel layer.

DATE:
March 18, 2021 04:00 PM Mountain Time (US and Canada) 

SPEAKER:
Mr. Ajay Sharma, and Mr. Dan Ferg

Ajay Sharma, P. Eng
Ajay is a Professional Civil Engineer with over 17 years of experience in project management, site supervision, engineering design, and construction management within the heavy civil construction, mining and oil and gas sectors throughout Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom

Dan Ferg, P.Eng
Dan Ferg is GeoStabilization’s Regional Engineer for Canada. After earning his Civil Engineering Technologist diploma from SAIT in Calgary, Dan worked briefly as a CAD designer and field supervisor for a local civil engineering firm. He then attended the University of British Columbia where he earned his Civil Engineering degree. Dan spent the next eight (8) years as a Geotechnical Engineer with consulting firms in Canada and New Zealand. Dan has worked in remote locations throughout Western Canada and New Zealand; as well as project work in Qatar, Guinea, and Mexico.

TOPIC:
Calf Robe Bridge – Abutment Stabilization

The Calf Robe Bridge is located in Calgary Alberta on the major corridor of Highway 2 also known as Deerfoot Trail. The bridge is located adjacent to the Bonnybrook Wastewater Treatment Plant (BBWWTP) which was being upgraded. A part of the upgrade was to install a discharge conduit downstream of the bridge. The alignment of the conduits was installed through the toe of the bridge abutment. Therefore, a bespoke stabilization solution for the abutment was required.

The bridge abutment and near surface soils consisted of a primarily granular fill, overlying fluvial sand and gravel, overlying sedimentary bedrock. The required excavation was expected to terminate near the bedrock interface, thus an over-steepened excavation was required in non-cohesive soils. Core samples of the bedrock suggested that a shear band is possible within the mudstone that is interlayered with more competent sandstone. The potential shear band was located below the excavation causing concern for deeper seated abutment failure.

The Geotechnical design for slope and abutment stability were led by GSI with critical review points by key stakeholders. A monitoring and controls plan was developed, and the site was monitored by GSI and the owners engineer. Daily surveys and in-situ instrumentation were used to provide confidence to stakeholders that this key piece of infrastructure would remain in service during the conduit installation process.

A design – build solution was chosen to stabilize the abutment to allow for the installation of the conduits. The solution consisted of the installation of 280 hollow bar soil nails with a 150 mm shotcrete facing. To mitigate against the potential shear band the design called for the installation of 118 drilled shafts backfilled with reinforced concrete.

DATE:
February 17, 2021 04:00 PM Mountain Time (US and Canada)

Speaker:
Dr Ron Wong, University of Calgary

Dr. Ron Wong holds his degrees from McMaster University and University of Alberta. Prior to joining University of Calgary, he gained more than 10 years of experience in geotechnical and structural engineering in consulting and energy sectors. His current research interests focus on fatigue behavior of geomaterials under environmental loading.

Topic:
Soil-Pipe Interaction in Moving Slopes: Some Missing Gaps

Physical model tests were conducted to replicate soil-pipe interaction in moving slopes under axial, vertical uplift and lateral loading. Varying displacement rates were used in the prototype tests. Failure modes observed in the tests are distinctly different from those assumed in the existing ASCE/ALA/PRCI Guidelines, which may result in inconsistency in estimation of soil resistance. Furthermore, the test results illustrate that the soil-pipe system exhibits a time- or rate-dependent behavior, i.e., “isotach” behavior. The soil resistance increases with increasing pipe displacement rate, or vice versa. Practical implications of (i) failure mode and (ii) time-dependent behavior on the performance of buried pipelines subjected to long-term ground movement are addressed.

Calgary Geotechnical Society Online Presentation

DATE:
Jan 20, 2021 04:00 PM Mountain Time (US and Canada)

SPEAKER:
Mr. Scott McKean.

TOPIC:
Rock Mass Characterization & Data Science in Petroleum Geomechanics

Scale, uncertainty, and cost noticeably intersect in petroleum geomechanics. This talk provides a general overview of applied petroleum geomechanics for geotechnical engineers, based on Mr. McKean’s experience at the University of Calgary through graduate studies,at CNOOC studying thermal and unconventional assets, and at Chevron as a subsurface data scientist. The talk focuses on the intersection of data science and subsurface characterization. First, the importance of the rock mass and discrete fracture networksis presented along with some of the strategies used to characterize them and make decisions. Second, uncertainty and cost in geomechanical characterization is discussed with a focus on how we can embrace the paucity of experimental data and uncertainty atscale, as well as integrate disparate data sources. Finally, the talk provides some speculative thoughts on how data science and subsurface characterization might intersect in the near future.

DATE:
Dec 9th, 2020 04:00 PM Mountain Time (US and Canada)

SPEAKER:
Dr. Richard Guthrie, MSc, PhD, MASME, P. Geo.
Dr Richard Guthrie is an internationally recognized geoscientist with expertise in geohazards and risk assessment. His research is published in leading scientific journals including Nature Geoscience, Geomorphology, Natural Hazards and Earth Systems Science,Landslides, Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, and the Quarterly Journal of Engineering Geology and Hydrogeology (among others). He is the recipient of multiple awards including Best Paper in EGBC’s Innovation (2018), Best Paper at IPC (2018), and theConsulting Engineers of Alberta Showcase Award (2019) for software (LABS: an agent-based landslide simulation model). As the director for the Geohazards and Geomorphology at Stantec, Dr. Guthrie leads an expert team of specialists to solve slope, river anderosion problems related to engineering, construction, and the natural environment.

TOPIC:
Spies and Landslides – How an Agent-Based Model Better Predicts Debris Flow Runout
Credible models of landslide runout are a critical component of hazard and risk analysis in the mountainous regions worldwide. Hazard analysis benefits enormously from the number of available landslide runout models that can recreate events and provide keyinsights into the nature of landsliding phenomena. Regional models that are easily employed, however, remain a rarity. For debris flows and debris avalanches, where the impacts may occur some distance from the source, there remains a need for a practical,predictive model that can be applied at the regional scale.

Landslides: Agent-Based Simulation, or LABS, is software that simplifies the complex behavior of debris flows and debris avalanches (collectively referred to as debris flows) to provide reasonable predictions of landslide runout, inundation, and depth alongthe path.
This talk will introduce LABS, explain what an agent-based simulation is and why it works so well, and provide case studies where LABS was successfully deployed. In addition to the slide show, a live video feed will demonstrate LABS in action and discuss someof the pros and cons of deploying such a model.

Date
Wednesday November 18, 2020

Event
November 2020 –Regular Series Lecture

Location
Zoom Video Conferencing

Time
4:00 PM Mountain Time

Speakers
Dr. Jim Oswell
Jim Oswell is a geotechnical and permafrost engineer based in Calgary. His work has taken him across northern Canada and into Alaska, Siberia and the Tibetan Plateau of China. He specializes in permafrost engineering and soil-pipeline interaction problems. He has a Ph.D. in geotechnical engineering from the University of Manitoba.

Topic
An Antarctica Geotechnical Investigation

Abstract
In late October 2019, Jim Oswell traveled from Canada to Antarctica as part of a team preparing to develop and construct a new research station for the New Zealand government on Ross Island (77°51′ South).
Jim spent 10 days on site and was able to witness the last sunset (until February 22, 2020), baby seals being born on the ice pack, hike some hills with views of active volcanoes and glaciers, and lots of drill core. This talk will provide photographs of his visit including transport by the US Air Force from Christchurch New Zealand to a runway on the polar ice shelf, the New Zealand Scott Base research station, the United States McMurdo research station, and the ground conditions where the new research station will be constructed. The near surface materials comprise interbedded layers of basalt and scoria with ice crystals and discrete columnar ice layers. He will describe some of the challenges with working in this environment and the challenges of foundation design where the mean monthly air temperature never rises above freezing. The talk will also address several issues related to foundation design in permafrost, namely the effect of raised buildings on ground temperatures and the delusion that larger spread footings may mitigate self-weight thaw settlement.

RSVP
Pre-register at Zoom Online

Date
October 28, 2020

Event
October 2020 – Regular Series Lecture

Location
Zoom Video Conferencing

Time
3:30 – 5:30 pm

Speaker
Mr. Andrew Bayliss

Topic
Impacts of glacially-modified valley land systems on the geotechnical design, construction and performance of dam foundations in Canada.

RSVP
Pre-register at Zoom Online

2019-2020

Welcome to the 2020–2021 lecture series!

The regular lecture series is held at the Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre at 3112 11th Street NE, Calgary. (See map here).
There is parking available either at the ACC or on-street.
The talks are held either in the upstairs hall or downstairs – doors on the west side of the building.

Lectures are free to attend unless stated otherwise.

Date
Thursday March 19, 2020

Event
March – Regular Series Lecture

Location
Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 – 11 Street NE, Calgary

Time
5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and light snack
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation

Speakers
Dr. Jim Oswell
Jim Oswell is a geotechnical and permafrost engineer based in Calgary. His work has taken him across northern Canada and into Alaska, Siberia and the Tibetan Plateau of China. He specializes in permafrost engineering and soil-pipeline interaction problems. He has a Ph.D. in geotechnical engineering from the University of Manitoba.
Topic An Antarctica Geotechnical Investigation

Abstract
In late October 2019, Jim Oswell traveled from Canada to Antarctica as part of a team preparing to develop and construct a new …
research station for the New Zealand government on Ross Island (77°51′ South). Jim spent 10 days on site and was able to witness the last sunset (until February 22, 2020), baby seals being born on the ice pack, hike some hills with views of active volcanoes and glaciers, and lots of drill core.
This talk will provide photographs of his visit including transport by the US Air Force from Christchurch New Zealand to a runway on the polar ice shelf, the New Zealand Scott Base research station, the United States McMurdo research station, and the ground conditions where the new research station will be constructed. The near surface materials comprise interbedded layers of basalt and scoria with ice crystals and discrete columnar ice layers. He will describe some of the challenges with working in this environment and the challenges of foundation design where the mean monthly air temperature never rises above freezing.

Cost
$20 for regular members; free for full-time students.

Limited
tickets will be available at the door for cash or cheque only.
Pre-registration is required for regular members and students.

RSVP
Pre-register at Eventbrite
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

Date
Tuesday February 25, 2020

Event
February – CGS Colloquium Lecture Series

Location
Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 – 11 Street NE, Calgary

Time
5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and light snack
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation

Speakers
Dr. Kathy Kalenchuk
Dr. Kalenchuk completed her BSc. Mining Engineering at the UofA, and her M.Sc & Ph.D Geomechanical Engineering at Queen’s. She is the President and Principal Consultant of RockEng Inc. Kathy has over 12 years of experience in geotechnical and geomechanical engineering in the mining industry, and her areas of expertise are primarily focused on underground mine design, support design, induced seismicity and numerical modelling.

Topic
Mitigating a fatal flaw in modern geomechanics: understanding uncertainty, applying model calibration, and defying the hubris in numerical modelling

Abstract
This colloquium has been prepared to achieve two objectives. The first objective is to provide a discussion …
of the practical limitations of numerical modelling in the field of geomechanical engineering. Too many discussions of numerical methods in geomechanical engineering are centered on the impressive ability of numerical tools to conduct complex and sophisticated analyses with relative ease and efficiency. Practitioners need to have a grounded conversation of numerical modelling with the reality that geomechanical designs are often data limited, with high degrees of uncertainty. When data limits and uncertainty are overlooked geomechanical engineers are at risk of introducing unforeseen fatal flaws in our engineering design. The second objective is to provide ‘how to’ guidelines for model calibration using a variety of ground reaction data types. Model calibration is truly the only means to reduce numerical uncertainties. Formal training in numerical modelling is often focused on software utilization and sometimes computational methods, however there are few opportunities for formal training on how to calibrate a model for practical engineering applications. This colloquium provides workflow guidelines for calibration methods and procedures.

Cost
$20 for regular members; free for full-time students.
Limited tickets will be available at the door for cash or cheque only.
Pre-registration is required for regular members and students.

RSVP
Pre-register at Eventbrite
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

Date
Thursday November 5, 2019

Event
November – Fall 2019 Cross Canada Lecture Tour (CCLT)

Location
Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 – 11 Street NE, Calgary (Main Hall)

Time
5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar
6:00 – 6:30 pm: Buffet Dinner
6:30 – 7:30 pm: Lecture

Speakers
Dr. Ian Moore, GeoEngineering Centre at Queen’s – RMC
Dr. Moore is a Civil Engineer specializing in Geotechnical Engineering, Engineering Mechanics, Non-linear Soil-structure Interaction, and the Non-linear Mechanics of Shell Structures like pipes interacting with solids such as soil, employing both computational and experimental methods. His work includes research on stability limit states for long-span flexible culverts, buried pipes (concrete, steel, aluminum, polyethylene and PVC), manholes and buried tanks. Recent research includes continued development of design methods for thermoplastic, metal and concrete culverts, assessment of strength of corroded metal (corrugated steel and cast iron) pipes, behaviour of liners used to repair gravity flow and pressure pipelines, soil-pipe interaction during pipe bursting and horizontal directional drilling, behaviour and design of pipe joints and of continuous and jointed pipelines when subjected to differential ground movements.

Topic
Some Days the Earth Doesn’t Stand Still: Pipeline Response to Imposed Ground Movement.

Abstract
Various circumstances arise where pipelines are subjected to ground movement,…
and successful pipeline performance is contingent on understanding and accounting for the resulting pipe-soil interaction. This presentation presents the results of experimental and computational studies examining the details of three kinds of ground motions.
Firstly, problems involving movement laterally past pipelines buried within are examined, such as those that result from down slope soil movements or as soil is displaced ahead and below the keel of an iceberg. Measurements of pipe deformations and bending are compared with three dimensional finite element analyses. Experimental observations of soil displacement fields, strain fields, and zones of localized shear failure around pipelines are then presented, and compared with nonlinear finite element analyses.
Secondly, pipeline response to differential ground movement is studied where the pipeline straddles across a normal ground fault. Centrifuge studies are used to investigate the impact of pipeline flexibility on behaviour, as well as the performance of conventional ‘beam on elastic spring’ buried pipeline models. Prototype scale experiments using a new test box are then discussed, for both continuous PVC and jointed clay sewer pipes.
Lastly, investigations into the causes of cast iron pipe fracture are summarized, resulting from frost heave in the overlying soil materials. Conclusions regarding the causes of ring fracture in small diameter pipes during extreme cold events are drawn, and potential approaches to identify and remedy these issues.

Cost
$50 for general admission, $20 for students. Limited tickets will be available at the door for cash or cheque only. Pre-registration is required for all tickets.

RSVP
Pre-register at Eventbrite
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

Date
Thursday October 17, 2019

Event
October – CyGS Student Award Winner Presentation

Location
University of Calgary Main Campus, 2500 University Dd NW, Calgary, AB, T2N 1N4

Time
5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snack
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation

Speakers
Dr. C.K. Wong, Post-Doctorate Scholar, University of Calgary
Dr. Chee K. Wong is a Post-Doctorate Scholar at the University of Calgary currently working on high temperature and high pressure strength testing of shales and mine tailings. He completed his PhD at the UofC in 2018 and has published articles in journals and conferences on topics including the hybrid failure mode in compacted clay, physical modelling of buried pipeline response in elasto-viscoplastic soils and crack initiation in brittle rock under pore pressure elevation. Dr. Wong was the winner of the EIT/Student Award and has presented his findings in his paper at the CGS conference in St. John’s NFL.

Topic
Physical Soil-Pipe Interaction Model Tests and their Practical Implications

Abstract
Pipelines have been designed and constructed to transport essential natural resources such as water, oil, and natural gas.
They are constructed at shallow depths through different geologic terrains. Permanent ground deformations can occur in actively moving slopes, landslides, surface faulting and ground subsidence. These ground movements impose external load on buried pipes. Large strain may be accumulated in the buried pipes over time, and it may affect the performance of the pipes. The external load exerted on the pipe by the ground movement is dependent on the soil resistance mobilized in soil-pipe interaction. Recent available pipeline design guidelines (e.g., American Lifelines Alliance (ALA) and Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI))provide recommendations on soil ultimate resistances for different soil types in drained and undrained loading conditions. However, these guidelines do not consider the effect of soil displacement rate on the soil ultimate resistance in soil-pipe interaction. This paper proposes to use the concept of “isotache” behavior to quantify the relationship between the soil-pipe relative displacement rate and the soil ultimate resistance on the pipe in soil-pipe interaction in compacted clays. The relationship is developed based on results measured in physical soil-pipe interaction models. Practical examples are presented to illustrate the use of this relationship to evaluate the performance of buried pipelines subjected to short-and long-term ground movements.
Unconfined compression strength(UCS)or response is used as a consistency index for classification of natural clay. This strength is determined from an unconfined compression test, a special type of unconsolidated-undrained test in which no confining pressure is applied to the test specimen and the specimen is sheared in an undrained condition. For saturated clay, the UCS or undrained shear strength is independent of the confining pressure, and is an indicator of consistency in stiffness. However, the structure of compacted clay is more heterogeneous than that of natural clay because of variation in compaction effort and water content in compacted clay. This study investigates if UCS can be used as a consistency index for compacted clay. Two different types of clay, Calgary till and Regina clay were used. The clay contents of Calgary till and Regina clay are about 15 and 45%, respectively. Compacted clay specimens were prepared at varying water contents using standard Proctor method. Computer X-ray scanning technique and filter paper method were conducted to quantify the variation of bulk density and matric suction along the specimen height for compacted specimens, respectively. Then, unconfined compression tests were conducted on the compacted clay specimens to determine the UCS. Empirical correlations among bulk density, matric suction and UCS were developed. In addition, these data were analyzed using a statistical approach. The results provide confidence levels for the use of UCS as a consistency index for compacted clay used in construction

Cost
$20 for general admission, free for full-time students. Limited tickets will be available at the door for cash or cheque only. Pre-registration is required for general admission and students.

RSVP
Pre-register at Eventbrite
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

Date
Monday September 9, 2019

Event
November – Special Tour Lecture

Location
University of Calgary Downtown Campus, 906 8 Avenue Southwest, Calgary, AB T2P 1H9, Canada

Time
5:30 – 6:00 pm: Registration and Networking
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Dinner
7:00 – 8:00 pm: Lecture

Speakers
Professor John Burland
Professor John Burland, CBE, DSc(Eng), FREng, FRS, NAE,FIC, FCGI was educated in South Africa and studied Civil Engineering at the University of the Witwatersrand. He returned to England in 1961 and worked with Ove Arup and Partners fora few years in London. After studying for his PhD at Cambridge University, Professor Burland joined the Building Research Station in 1966, became Head of the Geotechnics Division in 1972 and Assistant Director in 1979. In 1980 he was appointed to the Chair of Soil Mechanics at the Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine. He is now Emeritus Professor and Senior Research Investigator at Imperial College. In addition to being very active in teaching (which he loves) and research, John Burland has been responsible for the design of many large ground engineering projects such as the underground car park at the Palace of Westminster and the foundations of the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre. He specialises in problems relating to the interaction between the ground and masonry buildings. He was London Underground’s expert witness for the Parliamentary Select Committees on the Jubilee Line Extension and has advised on many geotechnical aspects of that project, including ensuring the stability of the Big Ben Clock Tower. He was a member of the international board of consultants advising on the stabilisation of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Mexico City and was a member of the Italian Prime Minister’s Commission for stabilising the Leaning Tower of Pisa. He has received many awards and medals including the Kelvin Gold Medal for Outstanding contributions to Engineering, the Harry Seed Memorial Medal of the American Society of Civil Engineers for distinguished contributions as an engineer, scientist and teacher in soil mechanics and the Gold Medals of the Institution of Structural Engineers, the Institution of Civil Engineers and the World Federation of Engineering Organisations. He has been awarded six Honorary Doctorates and he is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering, the Royal Society and is a Foreign Member of the US National Academy of Engineering. In 2002 he was President of the Engineering Section of the British Association and he was Vice President (Engineering) of the Institution of Civil Engineers, London from 2002 to 2005. In 2005 he was appointed CBE for services to Geotechnical Engineering. Prof. Burland retired from full-time teaching in 2004 however he continues to teach on the MSc course and assists in current research in soil mechanics and geotechnical engineering in his position as Emeritus Professor and Senior Research Investigator at Imperial.

Topic
A Tale of two Towers – Big Ben and Pisa

Abstract
The Leaning Tower of Pisa has been inexorably increasing its inclination to the point where it was about to collapse.
After years of study and trials, stabilisation measures were carried out using a novel method of soil extraction from beneath the high side of the foundation bringing the tower back to its inclination in 1838. The inclination of the Big Ben Clock Tower has been influenced by a number of activities including the construction of the underground car park beneath New Palace Yard in the 1970’s and, more recently, by the construction of the Jubilee Line Extension tunnels and the 40m deep new Westminster underground station. The movements of this tower were controlled by a different, equally novel method of injecting grout beneath the low side of the foundation. The lecture will describe the response of these two famous towers to the stabilisation works and present the latest results.

Cost
$50 for general admission. Free for the first 10 full-time students to register. $20 for full-time students thereafter.
Free street parking available.
Limited tickets will be available at the door for cash or cheque only. Pre-registration is required for general admission and students.

RSVP
Pre-register at Eventbrite
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

2018-2019

Welcome to the 2018–2019 lecture series!

The regular lecture series is held at the Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre at 3112 11th Street NE, Calgary. (See map here).
There is parking available either at the ACC or on-street.
The talks are held either in the upstairs hall or downstairs – doors on the west side of the building.
Lectures are free to attend unless stated otherwise.

Date
Monday June 3, 2019

Event
June – Spring 2019 Cross Canada Lecture Tour (CCLT)

Location
Edgemont Community Centre, 33 Edgevalley Circle NW, Calgary (Panorama Room)

Time
6:30 – 7:00 pm: Registration and Snacks
7:00 – 8:00 pm: Lecture

Speakers
Charles D. Shackelford, Ph.D., P.E., F.ASCE.
Charles D. Shackelford is Professor and Head of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. He has 35 years of experience pertaining to the geoenvironmental engineering aspects of waste management and environmental remediation, is a licensed professional (civil) engineer (P.E.) in California and Colorado, and has served as an expert on waste disposal issues on numerous occasions for private companies and federal and international agencies (e.g., International Atomic Energy Agency). Dr. Shackelford’s research is focused primarily on evaluating flow (seepage) and transport of liquids and contaminants through engineered soil and geosynthetic containment barriers used for liquid and solid waste containment. His research contributions pertaining to the role of diffusion in containment barrier design were recognized in 1995 with the receipt of the Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Prize from the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), and he was recognized in 2013 for his career contributions to the field of environmental geotechnics with the receipt of the inaugural R. Kerry Rowe Honorary Lecture from the International Society for Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering (ISSMGE). He has served as an editor for both the ASCE Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering and the Journal of Hazardous Materials published by Elsevier, Amsterdam, and currently serves as an editorial board member of Elsevier’s Geotextiles and Geomembranes and as an associate editor of the Canadian Geotechnical Journal. He also was past chair of the Geoenvironmental Engineering Committee (GEC) of ASCE’s Geo-Institute, and past co-chair for the Environmental Geotechnics Committee TC215 of the ISSMGE, and currently serves as a member of both the GEC and TC215. His M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in civil (geotechnical) engineering are from the University of Texas at Austin in 1983 and 1988, respectively.

Topic
Enhanced Bentonites for Sustainable Chemical Containment

Abstract
Bentonites are naturally occurring, high swelling clays that are mined, processed, and used for a variety of practical applications…
(e.g., drilling mud, groundwater well seal) and as an ingredient in industrial and commercial products. The ability of bentonites to swell when exposed to water and form a tight porous medium with low hydraulic conductivity also makes bentonites attractive for use as engineered, low-permeability hydraulic and chemical containment barriers, such as geosynthetic clay liners, compacted sand-bentonite liners, soil-bentonite vertical cutoff walls, and bentonite buffers for high level radioactive waste disposal. However, exposure of natural (traditional) bentonites to chemical solutions results in reduced swell that can lead to substantial (orders of magnitude) increases in the permeability of bentonites. For this reason, enhanced bentonites comprising traditional bentonites that are treated chemically to improve the resistance to adverse chemical interactions are being considered for use in engineered chemical containment barriers. This presentation will provide background on the fundamental behavior of traditional bentonites, discuss the issue of the compatibility of traditional bentonites permeated with chemical solutions, introduce the concept of chemical sustainability in terms of hydraulic conductivity, and describe the use of enhanced bentonites for engineered chemical containment barriers. The properties of four commonly evaluated enhanced bentonites, viz., bentonite polymer composite, dense prehydrated GCL, hyper clay, and multiswellable bentonite, as well as proprietary contaminant resistant clays, will be presented and compared with those for traditional bentonites, and potential issues related to long-term stability will be discussed.

Cost
$20 per person, free for full-time students.

RSVP
Pre-register at Eventbrite
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

Date
Thursday May 16, 2019

Event
AGM – Calgary and National Reports, CyGS Awards and Lecture

Location
Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 – 11 Street NE, Calgary (Main Hall)

Time
5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Registration
6:00 – 6:30 pm: Buffet Dinner
6:30 – 7:00 pm: Awards and CyGS Presentation
7:00 – 8:00 pm: Presentation by Pete Barlow

Speakers
Pete Barlow, M.Sc., P.Eng., BGC Engineering Inc.
Pete Barlow is a graduate from the geotechnical program at the University of Alberta, where he obtained an MSc. in 1986. He has been working as a consulting engineer since then on a wide range of geotechnical projects, mainly in the mining, pipeline and transportation industries. The application of geotechnical engineering to the pipeline industry has been a particular area of focus in the past several years, including trenchless crossings, slope stability and geohazards. He is currently a Principal Engineer with BGC Engineering, working out of their Edmonton office, on projects in Canada, the US and South America.

Topic
Reactivation of an Ancient Landslide: Pipeline Rupture and Mitigation

Abstract
Land disturbance associated with the progressive expansion of a major pipeline and power corridor, and extensive timber harvesting triggered the reactivation of ground movement of a massive, ancient deep-seated landslide…
that threatened six major transmission pipelines, including a loss of containment in one of the pipelines. The disturbances were relatively subtle in comparison to the size and depth of the slide, which highlights the extreme sensitivity of the slope. Given the very shallow 4.5 degree slope inclination and the lack of any surface expression of distress over most of the slope area, this case history underscores the importance of considering regionally specific geological conditions with pipeline geohazard evaluations. Extensive measures were implemented to stabilize and manage the landslide included a series of targeted surface and ground water control measures that minimized environmental impact and produced an approximate 100-fold reduction in movement rates.

Sponsors
Mobile Augers and Research Ltd.
BGC Engineering Inc.
The involvement and contribution of the organizers and sponsors is gratefully acknowledged.

Cost
$50 for regular memebers; $20 for full-time students.
Limited tickets will be available at the door for cash or cheque only.
Pre-registration is required for regular members and students.

RSVP
Pre-register at Eventbrite
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

Date
Thursday April 18, 2019

Event
April – Regular Series Lecture

Location
Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 – 11 Street NE, Calgary

Time
5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snacks
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation

Speakers
Dr. Alastair McClymont
Alastair McClymont is a professional geophysicist with Advisian (a division of WorleyParsons Canada Services Ltd). He has over 15 years of experience in the application of diverse near-surface geophysical techniques to geotechnical site characterization, groundwater exploration, contaminated site remediation, seismic hazard assessments, archeological investigations and other projects. Prior to joining Advisian, Alastair completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Geoscience at the University of Calgary, where his research focused on geophysical applications in groundwater and permafrost projects. He has a B.Sc.(Hons.) in Geology from Victoria University of Wellington (1998), an M.Sc. in Geophysics from the University of British Columbia (2004) in Vancouver, and a Ph.D. in Geophysics from ETH Zurich (the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology; 2008). Alastair has extensive experience in western Canada and has worked on a number of international projects. His recent archaeological work at Holocaust sites in Lithuania was the subject of the PBS NOVA science television documentary Holocaust Escape Tunnel (2017) and the feature film The Good Nazi (2018).

Topic
Applications of Geophysical Methods to Support Geotechnical Investigations

Abstract
Geophysical methods have been a part of the geotechnical engineering toolbox for decades and, although adoption of the technology…
over this time has been slow, their use on infrastructure projects has now become routine. New developments in instrumentation and methodology have enabled geophysical data to be acquired over increasingly larger areas, at greater density, and in more dimensions (including time). With these advancements it has become possible to obtain non-invasive, spatially continuous measurements of the subsurface, which can be used to interpolate between and extrapolate from boreholes, geological exposures and excavations. In this presentation I will summarize just a few examples of the application of various geophysical methods to geotechnical engineering projects. The presentation will feature a broad array of engineering geophysical methods and applications using examples, and will demonstrate the advantages and limitations of the technology. The examples will include geophysical assessments for foundation design, mapping overburden and soil thicknesses for site grading and volumetric calculations of expected construction fill and spoil, characterizing geology beneath waterways for optimizing pipeline crossings, and mapping legacy infrastructure on brownfield sites.

Cost
$20 per person, free for full-time students.

RSVP
Pre-register at Eventbrite
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

Date
Thursday March 21, 2019

Event
March – Regular Series Lecture

Location
Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 – 11 Street NE, Calgary

Time
5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snacks
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation

Speakers
Lucy Philip, M.Sc., P.Eng.
Lucy Philip is a Principal and Senior Geotechnical Engineer at Stantec in Calgary. Lucy works on projects all over Western Canada and globally and over the past year has worked on projects in North America, South America and Australia. Originally from the UK, she has an M.Sc. in Engineering Geology and has been in Canada for 11 years; she uses this geological background to better understand and characterize ground conditions and often applies this to rock engineering projects. Over the past year she has presented to the Nevada RoundTable on geotechnical risk and uncertainty in mining geotechnics and has guest lectured to structural geology students at the U of C. Lucy enjoys developing and growing junior staff. Outside of work, Lucy likes to ski and enjoys the outdoors. She is a regular volunteer on the ski hill and this year is a technical official for the alpine events at the Canada Winter Games.

Topic
What do we know? What don’t we know? Dealing with risk and uncertainty in open pit stability design

Abstract
This talk reviews common sources of risk and uncertainty in open pit stability and presents ideas for reducing and dealing with…
the uncertainty. Risks may present opportunities for pit optimization and this is also explored
Four themes are presented, with ideas for dealing with risk and uncertainty proposed under each theme:
Operational execution and flexibility. This theme presents the need for a Slope Stability Execution Plan including a performance approach and a Plan-Check- Act cycle. Inspections and potential mitigation form part of this theme.
Analysis. This theme reviews risk communication as a strategy for informed decision making, factor of safety approaches, discusses probabilistic analyses, discusses risk and opportunity registers and the importance of integrating interaction with other earth structures, which can be overlooked due to the structures being part of a different work package.
Back to Basics. This theme reviews optimization of investigations and techniques of obtaining and presenting useful information.
Open Your Eyes. This theme reviews evidence-based design, identifies different approaches adopted by other geotechnical projects and industries and reviews how these may be applied to open pit stability, and the importance of third-party reviews.
Although focused on open pits, this talk is also relevant to other mining structures such as waste dumps and dams as well as other geotechnical and rock engineering projects outside the mining industry.

Cost
$20 per person, free for full-time students.

RSVP
Pre-register at Eventbrite
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

Date
Thursday February 21, 2019

Event
February – Regular Series Lecture

Location
Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 – 11 Street NE, Calgary

Time 5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snacks
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation

Speakers
Eli Cuelho P.E.
Eli Cuelho, P.E., Senior Engineer at TRI and currently serves as the Director of TRI’s Transportation Testing and Research Division. He holds a Master’s degree from Montana State University in geotechnical engineering (1998). Eli has over twenty years of experience in geosynthetic application research as well as other transportation research areas such as pavement design and analysis, remote sensing and instrumentation, bridge deck performance, and specification development. He is well-published and active on numerous federal, state and industry research projects. Eli is working closely with TRI-Southeast’s large-scale testing laboratories to assist clients with full-scale geosynthetic system performance testing. He was a Research Engineer at the WTI from 1998 to 2017 and served as the Program Manager for the Infrastructure Maintenance and Materials program area. Eli is the chair of an ASTM task group dedicated to developing new test procedures for geosynthetics used as pavement and subgrade reinforcement. He is also a member of two TRB committees: the Dynamics and Field Testing of Bridges committee and the Geosynthetics committee. modulus.

Topic
Geosynthetics in Transportation – Subgrade Stabilization Research

Abstract
Road managers routinely use geogrids and geotextiles for subgrade stabilization applications. …
Typical subgrade stabilization applications are temporary haul roads or unpaved low-volume roads, but can also include paved roads built on poorer foundation materials. Full-scale test sections were constructed, trafficked and monitored to compare the relative operational performance of geosynthetics used as subgrade stabilization as well as determine which material properties are most related to performance. Seventeen 15-meter long test sections were constructed – fourteen containing geosynthetic reinforcement and three without. A subgrade material was prepared and constructed to an average CBR strength of approximately 1.8% and an average base course thickness of about 28 cm, with the exception of several controls where subgrade strength and base thickness were intentionally varied to evaluate the effect of these properties on performance. Even though the geotextile materials used during this study showed good performance as subgrade stabilization, material properties associated with their performance was difficult to establish due to the limited number of test sections and lack of relevant tests to properly characterize these types of materials for this application. Using longitudinal rut as the primary indicator of performance, it was determined that the strength and stiffness of the geogrid junctions and tensile strength properties in the cross-machine direction correlated well with performance. Using this knowledge, the design equation associated with the Giroud-Han method was calibrated to make geogrid junction stiffness in the cross-machine direction the primary property of the geosynthetic, thereby replacing geogrid aperture stability modulus.

Cost
Free (Generously sponsored by TenCate Geosynthetics)

RSVP
Pre-register at Eventbrite
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

Date
Thursday January 24, 2019

Event
January – Regular Series Lecture

Location
Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 – 11 Street NE, Calgary

Time
5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snacks
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation

Speakers
Dale Leckie, Ph.D., P.Geol.

Topic
Mountain building to rivers – Understanding the Paskapoo/Porcupine Hills Formation as background for geotechnical investigations in the Calgary Urban area

Abstract
Dale Leckie will present an overview of the geological evolution of Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin, with emphasis on the Paskapoo/Porcupine Hills Formation in the Calgary urban area. …

Cost
$20 per person, free for full-time students.

RSVP
Pre-register at Eventbrite
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

Date
Thursday November 15, 2018

Event
November – Regular Series Lecture

Location
Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 – 11 Street NE, Calgary (Main Hall)

Time
5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snacks
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation

Speakers
Bruce Jamieson, Ph.D., P.Eng., University of Calgary
Bruce has over 35 years of experience spanning snow avalanche hazard management, hazard assessment, snow and avalanche research, avalanche forecasting and avalanche control. He was president of the Canadian Avalanche Association (CAA) from 1992 to 1995, chaired the 1996 International Snow Science Workshop in Banff, Alberta and the CAA’s Technical Committee until 2004. During the summer of 2002 and fall of 2008 he was a guest researcher at the Swiss Federal Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research. Bruce was the Principal Investigator of the Applied Snow and Avalanche Research group at the University of Calgary (ASARC), where he supervised 24 graduate students investigating avalanche runout estimation, hazard mapping, avalanche forecasting, snowpack tests, etc. He is a Professional Engineer registered in British Columbia and Alberta, and a professional member of the CAA. Bruce has written over 70 papers in ISI journals, plus over 100 conference papers

Topic
Assessing, Mapping and Mitigating Snow Avalanche Risk

Abstract
In mid 2018, the Canadian Avalanche Association published a technical manual, entitled Planning Methods for Assessing…
and Mitigating Snow Avalanche Risk. Each of the fourteen chapters has two or three authors. Bruce Jamieson is the first author of each chapter.
Bruce will identify some aspects of snow avalanches that are different from other slope hazards such as debris flows:
1) explosives are effective triggers; 2) more occurrences; 3) impact forces are lower; 4) the failures initiate in a bonded material within a few degrees of its melting point; 5) the deposits disappear within months.
The effects of each of these factors on assessment or mitigation methods will be summarized. Selected methods for characterizing snow avalanche terrain and expected snow avalanches will be outlined. Short examples of qualitative, semi-quantitative and quantitative assessment and mapping methods will be presented for transportation corridors, occupied structures, transmission lines, and forests. Examples of mitigation methods including structural defences and remote avalanche control systems will be presented.

Cost
$20 per person, free for full-time students.

RSVP
Pre-register at Eventbrite
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

Date
Thursday October 11, 2018

Event
October – Fall 2018 Cross Canada Lecture Tour (CCLT)

Location
Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 – 11 Street NE, Calgary (Alpine Room)

Time
5:30 – 6:00 pm: Registration and Cash Bar
6:00 – 6:30 pm: Buffet Dinner
6:30 – 8:00 pm: Presentation

Speakers
Alex Sy, Ph.D., P.Eng., Klohn Crippen Berger Ltd.
Alex Sy is Vice President, Technical at Klohn Crippen Berger Ltd. in Vancouver, BC. He has more than 40 years of experience in geotechnical and earthquake engineering for transportation, water and wastewater infrastructures, heavy industrial facilities, hydroelectric and water retention dams, and mine tailings dams. He has worked throughout Canada and internationally. Alex has provided forensic engineering and expert witness services for infrastructure failures involving dams, dykes, bridges, pipelines, buildings and landslides. He currently serves on Independent Technical Review Boards for several major water supply projects and tailings storage facilities in high seismic environments.
Alex has a Bachelor in Civil Engineering from the University of Queensland in Australia, and a Master and Ph.D. in Geotechnical Engineering from the University of British Columbia. He is also an Adjunct Professor in the Civil Engineering Department of the University of British Columbia. He has authored more than 50 technical papers in various aspects of geotechnical and geoseismic engineering. Alex received the Canadian Geotechnical Colloquium award from the Canadian Geotechnical Society in 1996, and the VGS Award from the Vancouver Geotechnical Society in 2015. He is a Fellow of the Engineering Institute of Canada.Khokan completed Bachelor of Civil Engineering with distinction from Concordia University in 2012 and worked for three years as junior geotechnical engineer before enrolling in the M.Sc. program in university of Calgary.

Topic
Lessons Learned from Geotechnical Failures

Abstract
Despite advances in geotechnical engineering, failures do occasionally occur because of unknowns, uncertainties, inexperience,…
miscommunications, etc. However, failures do provide valuable lessons for the profession that can be learned to minimize future failures. This lecture will present three examples of geotechnical failures in British Columbia, in which the author was engaged to carry out forensic engineering. Pertinent details of the geotechnical failures and their causes are described for the following three case histories: (1) the dyke breach at the Stanley Street Pump Station located on the North Arm of the Fraser River in New Westminster; (2) the excessive foundation settlement at the Queensborough Middle School using stone column foundations in very soft soils at the east end of Lulu Island, and (3) the damaging ground movements at the Panorama/Ridgeview Subdivision located on an old landslide or “earthflow” in Chilliwack. Subsequent remedial solutions and lessons learned are also discussed.

Cost
$20 per person, free for full-time students.

RSVP
Pre-register at Eventbrite
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

Date
Thursday September 13, 2018

Event
November – Regular Series Lecture

Location
Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 – 11 Street NE, Calgary (Alpine Room)

Time
5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and light snack
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation

Speakers
Khokan Debnath
Khokan Debnath is currently an M.Sc. candidate in the Department of Civil Engineering and a Research Assistant in Gas Hydrate Geomechanics Group at University of Calgary. During his M.Sc. study, he specialized in numerical modeling on gas hydrate-bearing sediments. Khokan modeled thermal evolution in the gas hydrate bearing Arctic sediment to establish dissociated zones for select rates of seafloor temperature increase and evaluated the seafloor slope instabilities. Khokan completed Bachelor of Civil Engineering with distinction from Concordia university in 2012 and worked for three years as junior geotechnical engineer before enrolling in the M.Sc. program in university of Calgary.

Topic
Modeling Changes in Hydrate Stabilities Associated with Artic Warming ans its Impact on Slope Stabilities

Abstract
Large volumes of methane hydrate exist within marine sediments across the Arctic region,…
such as sediments on the continental margin of the Beaufort Sea. The low temperatures and high pressures required for hydrate stability, and the cold water in this region leads to hydrate being formed at comparatively shallower depths relative to other oceanic sediments. Because of global warming, it is estimated that the ocean bottom temperature of the Arctic region has increased by as much as 1?C since 1979. If this trend in increasing ocean bottom temperature were to continue, hydrate dissociation within the sediment may occur potentially causing slope instabilities. In this paper, changes in the seabed geothermal conditions were modeled to estimate the reduction in the hydrate stability zones within the sediment on the continental margin. The change in sediment strength due to gas hydrate dissociation has been incorporated as input variables in to a slope stability model to determine changes in factor of safety associated with hydrate dissociation and assess the potential for slope instabilities.

Cost
$20 per person, free for full-time students.

RSVP
Pre-register at Eventbrite
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

2017-2018

Welcome to the 2017–2018 lecture series!

The regular lecture series is held at the Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre at 3112 11th Street NE, Calgary. (See map here).
There is parking available either at the ACC or on-street.
The talks are held either in the upstairs hall or downstairs – doors on the west side of the building.
Lectures are free to attend unless stated otherwise.

Date
Thursday June 7, 2018

Event
June – Calgary Geotechnical Society Annual Meeting, Award Ceremony and Lecture

Location
Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 – 11 Street NE, Calgary (Main Hall)

Time
5:30 – 6:00 pm: Registration and Cash Bar
6:00 – 6:30 pm: Buffet Dinner and Wine
6:30 – 7:00 pm: Calgary and National Reports, CyGS Awards
7:00 – 8:00 pm: Lecture

Speakers
Mickey Davachi , Ph.D., Principal Geotechnical Engineer, Wood Plc.

Mickey Davachi has a BSc and an MSc in Civil Engineering and a DIC, an MSc and a PhD in Civil/Geotechnical Engineering. He is a Principal Geotechnical Engineer with Wood. He has over 48 years of broad and diverse experience in providing technical specialist review and advise, due diligence, expert witness, Engineer of Record, project management, study, planning, geotechnical investigation, design, construction supervision, dam safety review and safety inspection for a wide variety of Canadian and International industry sectors including mining, oil sands, multi-disciplinary hydroelectric, water power, water resources, wind power, ports, marine, industrial and transportation projects.

Topic
Diavik Diamond Mine in the Northwest Territories, Canada

Abstract
The Diavik Diamond Mine is an unincorporated joint venture between Diavik Diamond Mines Inc. (60%) and Aber Diamond…
Mines Ltd. (40%) Diavik Diamond Mines Inc. is a wholly owned subsidiary of Rio Tinto Plc of London, England. The Diavik Diamond Mine is located on a 20 square kilometre island known as East Island, in Lac de Gras, approximately 300 kilometres northeast of Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. Four diamond ore bodies, kimberlite pipes, are located beneath the waters of Lac de Gras just offshore of East Island. These four pipes, called A154 North, A154 South, A418 and A21 are being mined by open pit mining methods. In addition, two of the richer pipes, A154 South and A418, will support underground mining once open pit mining is completed. These four pipes contain reserves of 26 million tonnes of kimberlite. An average annual production rate of six million carats is expected. The ore will be mined over a 20-year mine life. To allow open-pit mining, Diavik constructed three water diversion structures (dikes) to allow the overlying water to be removed temporarily for mining. In 2002, Diavik completed the first dike that encircles the A154 North and A154 South pipes and removed the water behind the dike for open pit mining. Diamond production was started in early 2003. A154 dike was constructed using the crushed granite supplied from a quarry located on East Island. A418 dike was constructed from mined granitic rock from A154 open pit excavation. A plastic concrete cut off wall and the jet grouting was used for seepage control through the dike and overburden and weathered bedrock foundation. A grout curtain was constructed in the bedrock below the cut off wall.
This presentation will describe the site conditions, design data, design and construction of the dikes, the plastic concrete cut off wall, the grout curtain, the open pit and the underground.

Sponsors
Mobile Augers and Research Ltd.

Cost
$50 per person; pre-registration by Eventbrite required.
$20 for full-time students; a $20 sponsorship by Clifton Associates to this event is available by request at announce@cgygeosociety.org for the first five students.

RSVP
Eventbrite CyGS Annual General Meeting and Dr. Mickey Davachi Lecture
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

Date
Wednesday May 23, 2018

Event
May – Spring 2018 Cross Canada Lecture Tour (CCLT)

Location
Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 – 11 Street NE, Calgary (Alpine Room)

Time
5:30 – 6:00 pm: Registration and Cash Bar
6:00 – 6:30 pm: Buffet Dinner and Wine
6:30 – 7:30 pm: Lecture

Speakers
T.D. O’Rourke, Ph.D., Professor, Cornell University

Tom O’Rourke is the Thomas R. Briggs Professor of Engineering in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cornell University. He is a member of the US National Academy of Engineering, a Distinguished Member of ASCE, an International Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering, a Member of the Mexican Academy of Engineering, and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has received a number of distinctions for his research and teaching, including the Stephen D. Bechtel Pipeline Engineering and Ralph B.Peck Awards from ASCE. He gave the 2009 Rankine Lecture and 2016 Terzaghi Lecture.
Dr. O’Rourke served as President of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute (EERI) and as the chair or member of many professional society committees. He received the George W. Housner Medal in 2016 for contributions to earthquake engineering and has authored or co-authored over 380 technical publications. His research interests cover geotechnical engineering, earthquake engineering, underground construction technologies, engineering for large, geographically distributed systems, and geographic information technologies and database management. He has served on numerous government advisory boards, as well as the consulting boards or peer reviews for many projects associated with highway, rapid transit, water supply, and energy distribution systems, and has acted as an adviser on more than 120 projects in 13 different countries.

Topic
Ground Deformation Effects on Subsurface Pipelines and Infrastructure Systems

Abstract
There are tens of millions of km of pipelines worldwide used in water supplies, gas and liquid fuel delivery systems, electric…
power networks, and wastewater conveyance facilities. An overview of these critical infrastructure assets is provided. Soil-structure interaction affecting pipeline and underground conduit response to externally imposed ground deformation are examined, starting with stress transfer from soil to the circular surface of the pipe. Various models for soil-pipeline interaction are described, and a methodology is proposed for evaluating soil-pipeline interaction in granular soils for any direction of pipe movement at any depth. Suction-enhanced soil reaction to relative soil-pipe movement is discussed. Guidance is provided regarding soil-pipeline interaction modeling in which the pipeline is represented as a beam vs a three-dimensional shell. Large-scale laboratory testing and numerical modeling for the next generation hazard-resilient pipelines are described, and innovative ways of accommodating ground deformation are illustrated. Water supply system response to widespread liquefaction-induced ground deformation during the Canterbury Earthquake Sequence in New Zealand is evaluated with high-density LiDAR and GIS analyses, and a methodology is presented for estimating pipeline damage as the combined response to liquefaction-induced differential settlement and lateral ground strain. The community impact of pipeline system performance is illustrated with respect to the role that the water supply plays in fire suppression in San Francisco.

Cost
$45 per person; payment by cash or cheque at the door only; pre-registration by Eventbrite required.
Free for full-time students; pre-registration at announce@cgygeosociety.org

RSVP
Eventbrite CCLT Dr. O’Rourke
Please indicate any dietary restrictions at announce@cgygeosociety.org.

Date
Tuesday April 17, 2018

Event
April – Regular Series Lecture

Location
Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 – 11 Street NE, Calgary (Main Hall)

Time
5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snacks
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation

Speakers
Georgina Griffin, M.Eng. P.Eng., Clifton Associates Ltd.
Georgina Griffin, the 2017 recipient of the Calgary Geotechnical Society Award, has worked in the geotechnical consulting industry in Calgary for over 30 years. After graduating from the University of Alberta in 1984 with a B.Sc. in Civil Engineering only to discover that the job market was one of the worst in decades, she stayed on at the U of A to complete an M.Eng. in Civil Engineering with a specialization in Geotechnical Engineering. Since 1986, Georgina has worked for several consulting firms in Calgary including EBA Engineering, Thurber Engineering, UMA, Jacques Whitford, Stantec, AMEC, and currently Clifton Associates Ltd. Although most of her experience has covered most of Alberta, Georgina also had the opportunity early in her career to work in both the western and eastern Arctic. In 2017, Georgina was presented with the Calgary Geotechnical Society Award for her contribution to the geotechnical engineering community in Calgary.

Topic
Swelling and Shrinking Clays in Alberta

Abstract
Swelling and shrinking clays in Alberta do exist. These soils have impacted foundations across the province and often …
geotechnical engineers unfamiliar with their occurrence have either not recognized them or have not emphasized their impact to their clients. In southern Alberta, communities such as Drumheller, Cochrane, and Black Diamond have well known examples of structures that have been severely damaged due to swelling clays, but not many people know that there is at least one example in Calgary as well as a recent example in Drayton Valley. In the Edmonton area, there are clays that exhibit shrinkage rather than swelling. In this presentation, there will be discussions on the mechanisms involved in swelling and shrinkage; how to identify potential problem soils; project examples; tips on how to minimize or mitigate damages; and how to make your clients more aware of the issues.

Cost
$20 per person; free for full-time students.
Payment is by cash or check at the door only.

RSVP
Not Required

Date
Tuesday March 20, 2018

Event
March – Regular Series Lecture

Location
Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 – 11 Street NE, Calgary (Main Hall)

Time
5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snacks
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation

Speakers
Sam Proskin, Ph.D., P.Eng., Thurber Engineering Ltd.
Dr. Proskin is a senior geotechnical engineer with 21 years of consulting experience for mining, oil and gas, and public sectors in western Canada, NWT, Nunavut and Yukon Territory. Since joining Thurber in May 2015 senior geotechnical engineering support for earthfill structures and permafrost and provides leadership to the tailings geotechnical group in Calgary. His experience includes geotechnical engineering of permafrost, project management for northern construction projects, ice engineering of ice roads and ice pads geotechnical engineering of oil sands fine tailings. While at EBA Engineering, Dr. Proskin developed their ice cover and winter road engineering practice with the geophysical practice in ice profiling. The practice provided comprehensive design and monitoring services associated with temporary ice structures to support moving and stationary loads for energy and mining clients in Alberta, NWT, Nunavut and Manitoba. Dr. Proskin was a subject matter expert in the development of Alberta Workplace Best Practice for Building and Working Safely on Ice and Transportation Association of Canada’s Guidelines for Building and Operating Winter Roads. The NAPEGG’s Professional Award of Merit recognized his contribution to the Tibbitt to Contwoyto Winter Road in 2008. In 2011 his contributions to the Colomac Winter Road Project were honoured with INAC’s NWT Region Circle of Excellence Award. Dr. Proskin is a co-founder of NOR-EX Ice Engineering Inc., a consulting firm providing technical and management support to clients building and using ice covers across Canada. During his tenure as VP Engineering he was responsible for providing business management and technical leadership in ice and geotechnical engineering.

Topic
Ice Roads and Mine Resupply – Lessons from the Tibbitt to Contwoyto Winter Road, NWT
Abstract The Tibbitt to Contwoyto Winter road is a 300 km long temporary road across frozen lakes, boreal forest and tundra terrain…
in the Northwest Territories. It allows three major mining operations (Diavik, Ekati and Gahcho Kue) to bring in materials, equipment and fuel. About 80% of the road is built over lake ice covers and so requires special construction, engineering and QA to safely manage the transport of up to 10,000 loads and 340,000 tonnes in a given year.
This talk will highlight some of the lessons Sam learned from 2002 to 2012 when he worked on the project. It will also offer some advice for planning drilling or construction operations on lake or river ice and sea ice.

Cost
$20 per person; free for full-time students.
Payment is by cash or check at the door only.

RSVP
Not Required

Date
Thursday February 15, 2018

Event
February – Regular Series Lecture

Location
Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 – 11 Street NE, Calgary (Main Hall)

Time
5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snacks
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation

Speakers
Vanessa Werden, LL.D., SHK Law Corporation
Vanessa is a senior associate at SHK Law Corporation and her practice focuses on construction law and insurance defence, including defence of professional negligence claims and regulatory complaints on behalf of civil, structural and geotechnical engineers and architects. In her construction law practice, Vanessa advises developers, contractors, construction managers and trade contractors, on builders liens, contract disputes, cost overruns and delay claims. Vanessa’s experience includes a stadium construction litigation matter, and the arbitration of delay, extra work and deficiency claims following the construction of hydropower facilities on Vancouver Island and in northern British Columbia. Vanessa is a member of the Law Societies of British Columbia and Alberta.

Topic
Consultants’ Liability for Field Review

Abstract
Consultants can be liable for errors that are not their own. If a contractor makes a mistake which costs the owner money,…

in many cases the owner will sue both the contractor and the consultant. The owner will say that he was relying on the consultant to make sure that the contractor does his job correctly. Even third parties, such as subsequent owners, who have never met and had no contractual relationship with the consultant, will often allege they were relying on the consultant to protect them from contractor mistakes because of Letters of Assurance. Learn what you can be liable for and what you can do to minimize your risk. We hope this talk will provide some guidance for consultants who have to navigate this tricky area..

Cost
$20 per person; free for full-time students.
Payment is by cash or check at the door only.

RSVP
Not Required

Date
Tuesday January 23, 2018

Event
January – Regular Series Lecture

Location
Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 – 11 Street NE, Calgary (Main Hall)

Time
5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snacks
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation

Speakers
Ertan Ozmen, M.Sc., P.E., P.Eng., Clifton Associates Ltd.
Ertan Ozmen is the Practice Lead of Geotechnical and Materials Engineering groups of Clifton Associates. Ertan has a Master of Science degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Nevada, Reno. He is a registered professional civil engineer in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Nevada and California and has more than 20 years of progressive experience in managing geotechnical and construction materials testing projects. His background encompasses a wide range of geotechnical and geophysical skills.

Topic
Fundamentals of Project Management and Financial Basics for Geotechnical Professionals

Abstract
The presentation will cover the key financial terms such as “Accounts Receivable, Work-in-Progress, Fee Types – Cost Plus, Cost…
Plus Fixed Fee, Cost Plus Maximum, Lump Sum/Fixed Fee, Revenue, Utilization, Variance, Write off, Overhead and Profit Contribution.

Cost
$20 per person; free for full-time students.
Payment is by cash or check at the door only.

RSVP
Not Required

Date
Wednesday December 13, 2017– POSTPONED

Event
December – Regular Series Lecture

Location
Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 – 11 Street NE, Calgary (Main Hall)

Time
5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snacks
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation

Speakers
Ertan Ozmen, M.Sc., P.E., P.Eng., Clifton Associates Ltd.
Ertan Ozmen is the Practice Lead of Geotechnical and Materials Engineering groups of Clifton Associates. Ertan has a Master of Science degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Nevada, Reno. He is a registered professional civil engineer in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Nevada and California and has more than 20 years of progressive experience in managing geotechnical and construction materials testing projects. His background encompasses a wide range of geotechnical and geophysical skills.

Topic
Fundamentals of Project Management and Financial Basics for Geotechnical Professionals

Abstract
The presentation will cover the key financial terms such as “Accounts Receivable, Work-in-Progress, Fee Types – Cost Plus, Cost…
Plus Fixed Fee, Cost Plus Maximum, Lump Sum/Fixed Fee, Revenue, Utilization, Variance, Write off, Overhead and Profit Contribution.

Cost
$20 per person; free for full-time students.
Payment is by cash or check at the door only.

RSVP
Not Required

Date
Tuesday November 21, 2017

Event
November – Regular Series Lecture

Location
Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 – 11 Street NE, Calgary (Main Hall)

Time
5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snacks
6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation

Speakers
Shuai (Marshal) Man, M.Sc., University of Calgary
Marshal recently obtained his MSc degree in geotechnical engineering from the University of Calgary, under the supervision of Dr. Ron Wong. His MSc thesis discussed several interesting topics in hydraulic fracturing from a geotechnical perspective. The topics include the compression and creep behavior of granular materials, as well as particle-laden two-phase fluid flow. He is currently conducting research at the University of Calgary, with a focus on soil-pipeline interaction.

Topic
Crushing and Embedment of Proppants during High Stressed Rock-Proppant Interaction Test

Abstract
Proppant and sand play an important role in hydraulic fracturing. They keep hydraulically-induced fractures open by withstanding…
the in-situ compressive pressures. Under certain circumstances, inadequate material strength could cause proppant and sand particles to experience grain crushing. In this study, time-independent and -dependent compression behavior of proppant and sand grains are investigated experimentally and numerically. Furthermore, to mimic the mechanical behavior of proppant and sand under reservoir conditions in oil fields, rock-proppant interaction tests have been performed. In general, ceramic proppants showed superior mechanical performance to natural sand. Additionally, flow behavior of proppant and sand particles are investigated. Pressure gradients of particle-laden slurries flowing through a small-diameter pipe were experimentally investigated and subsequently simulated by numerical modeling. A generalized Darcy-Weisbach equation was proposed for the prediction of pressure gradients.

Cost
Free

RSVP
Not Required

Date
Tuesday October 24, 2017

Event
October – Fall 2017 Cross Canada Lecture Tour (CCLT)

Location
Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 – 11 Street NE, Calgary (Alpine Room)

Time
5:30 – 6:00 pm: Registration and Cash Bar
6:00 – 6:30 pm: Buffet Dinner
6:30 – 8:00 pm: Presentation

Speakers
Jean-Marie Konrad, ing, Ph.D., Professor, Université Laval
Dr. Konrad is a registered civil engineer with a Master’s degree from Université Laval and a Doctorate degree from the University of Alberta where he contributed to the development of frost heave mechanics. He worked in the private sector as a geotechnical engineer for SNC-Lavalin and James-Bay Hydro Electric Corporation, at the National Research Council with respect to the geotechnical aspects of the artificial drilling islands in the Beaufort Sea, development of interpretation techniques of in situ testing data in weak soils and academia at the University of Waterloo (Ontario) and Université Laval. From 1998 to 2008, he was the Chairholder of an NSERC industrial research chair on frost action in civil engineering structures. Presently he is professor of civil engineering at Université Laval and the Chairholder of an NSERC industrial research chair on the optimisation of the life-cycle of earth dams. Dr. Konrad is the author or co-author of over 150 technical papers. For the last twenty-five years, he has also been a consultant for various projects related to artificial freezing, permafrost engineering, dam construction and safety assessment.

Topic
Advances in Dam Design

Abstract
Embankment dam performance and lifespan are closely related to the hydric, thermal and mechanical behaviour of materials…
used during its construction. The apparent simplicity of embankment dams hides complex and often poorly known behaviours resulting from thermo-hydro-mechanical coupling phenomena. Understanding the different behaviours as well as their interrelationships is of paramount importance to optimize the life cycle of these structures. Hydro-Québec Production obtained the necessary approvals to build a 1,550-MW hydroelectric complex on the Rivière Romaine, north of the municipality of Havre-Saint-Pierre on the north shore of the St. Lawrence. The complex will consist of four hydropower generating stations with average annual output of 8.0 TWh. Construction of the Romaine-2 development began in 2009. Romaine-2 was commissioned in 2014 and the Romaine-1 development was commissioned in 2015. Work on the Romaine-3 and Romaine-4 developments, which will be operational in 2017 and 2020, respectively is underway. Since 2009, the NSERC/HQ industrial research chair in Life Cycle Optimization for Embankment Dams contributed to the advancement of various aspects in dam design. Major developments for seepage induced erosion are presented. The use of centrifuge testing for predicting deformation of Romaine 2 are discussed. Rockfill properties are viewed from a fractal perspective.

Cost
$50 per person, payment is by cash or cheque at the door only; pre-registration is required.

RSVP
By email to announce@cgygeosociety.org or phone Remco Kleinlugtenbelt at 403-852-3702 by October 19, 2017.
Please include your company name, phone number and indicate any dietary restrictions.

Date
Wednesday September 20, 2017

Event
September – Regular Series Lecture

Location
Austrian Canadian Cultural Centre, 3112 – 11 Street NE, Calgary (Main Hall)

Time
12:00 – 12:30 pm: Cash Bar and Light Snacks
12:30 – 1:30 pm: Presentation

Speakers
Jasmin Raymond, Ph.D., Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS)
Interested in geothermal energy, Professor Jasmin Raymond is conducting research work on low to medium temperature resources, including heat pump systems. The main objective of his projects, done in collaboration with geothermal designers, operators and manufacturers, is to improve the efficiency and profitability of systems by providing scientific and technological innovations. Field testing and numerical modeling are the main activities he carries out.
Mr Raymond is a hydrogeologist and he teaches geothermal energy basics at Institut national de la recherche scientifique in Quebec City. He obtained his Ph.D. at Laval University and a B.Sc. at McGill University. During his young career, he received numerous prices such as a Banting Scholarship for his postdoctoral research. He currently holds a research chair from l’Institut nordique du Québec to investigate the geothermal potential of northern communities and mines in addition to be the coleader of an international research group on geothermal energy supported by UNESCO. Highly involved in the scientific community, he participates to a task group of the Canadian Standard Association on geothermal heat pumps and the geothermal advisory committee of Geoscience BC. He coauthored a report from the Geological Survey of Canada on the geothermal potential of the country and was awarded the Canadian Geotechnical Society Colloquium in order to complete a Canadian lecture tour during 2016-2017.
http://www.inrs.ca/english/jasmin-raymond
http://www.inrs.ca/english/research-centres/ete/northern-geothermal-potential-research-chair

Topic
Assessment of the Subsurface Thermal Conductivity for Geothermal Applications

Abstract
The construction of green buildings using geothermal energy requires geo-scientists and engineers to evaluate the thermal…

Cost
Free

RSVP
Not Required